OPATIJA RIVIERA FAMILY ACCOMMODATION DAYS 2016

first_imgKvarner Tourist Board in cooperation with local tourist boards from 01-02.April.2016 organizes Days of family accommodation on the Opatija Riviera. The program consists of an educational workshop and the Kvarner family Open Day, and see the entire program below.Kvarner Family educational workshop, 01. April 2016. (Friday) in the restaurant Commodore (ACI marina Ičići) Liburnijska bb, 51414 Ičići, at 17 p.m. The educational workshop is free and is intended for all providers of household accommodation services as well as travel agencies that cooperate in business with providers of household accommodation services. The participation of owners of facilities bearing the quality label “Kvarner Family” and “Kvarner Family Agency” is mandatory. All participants will receive a certificate of attendance at the educational workshop. 2nd Open Day Kvarner Family family accommodation, 02. April 2016. (Saturday), from 10:00 to 13:00Open day Kvarner Family family accommodation is an invitation to all interested parties to visit selected, successful households with the quality mark “Kvarner Family” to see the houses and gardens, talk to the hosts and in direct contact to get the most important information about business opportunities.Organizers: Kvarner Tourist Board, Opatija Tourist Board, Ičići Tourist Board, Lovran Tourist Board, Matulji Tourist Board, Mošćenička Draga Tourist Board and Kastav Tourist Board Educational workshop program 1. Renters as carriers of destination information – Mrs. Tatjana Bartolin, director of the Tourist Board of Ičići2. Area of ​​activity of the tourist inspection – Tourist Inspection of the Ministry of Tourism – Ms. Tanja Frketić, Tourist Inspector of the Tourist Inspection of the Ministry of Tourism3. Area of ​​operation of the customs inspection – Ministry of FinanceMr. Igor Babić, Officer of the Customs Administration of Rijeka4. Security in tourism – preventive security measures to prevent burglary and theft – Mr. Damir Brnas, Chief of the Opatija Police Station5. Kvarner Family brand and credit incentives for renters – Mrs. Marica Mogorović, project manager at the office of the Kvarner Tourist Board6. Kvarner Family Facebook page – Kruno Kaurić, eMk Partner doo7. The importance of E-marketing for more successful business – Sasa Petkovic, KG Media8. Managing family accommodation – never easier! – Neven Palčec, MyRent9. Opatija Riviera, application – Oliver Kamenečki, Rome10. The word of the host11. Announcement of open doors and distribution of letters of thanks to the hosts and confirmation for the participants of the traininglast_img read more

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Watch a fantastic video of Plitvice Lakes under snow and ice

first_imgOn the Facebook page Plitviceblog.com a fantastic video of the Plitvice Lakes National Park under snow and ice has been published. The author of the video, Ante Fabris, in a light 4-hour walk in which he walked 15 kilometers with his dog, passes through various parts of the National Park and discovers all the beauty of Plitvice Lakes under the winter cover.The video has been viewed over 2,5 million times on Facebook and shared more than 52.000 times, see for yourself the beauty of Plitvice Lakes in winter. Enjoy.last_img read more

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METRO and Techstars are looking for the ten most innovative tourism startups

first_imgStartups that develop solutions for the business needs of hotels, restaurants and other caterers by June 18 can apply to participate in the third global program METRO Accelerator powered by Techstars via the website hospitality.metroaccelerator.com.Investors and mentors of the program will select the ten most innovative startups to join the program, which begins in September 2017, and selected startups will receive:investment offer in the amount of up to 120.000 eurosaccess to top management and a network of METRO and Techstars expertsmentoring of representatives of METRO and Techstars and other experts in the fields of procurement, sales, marketing, finance and communicationskorištenje co-working space in the heart of Berlin during the programmembership in the international network of Techstars and METRO Accelerators The first generation of startups, which developed their solutions for caterers as part of the METRO Accelerator program with the support of METRO and Techstars experts, attracted more than $ 52 million in investment – above the average of all Techstars programs.At the recent HoReCa MeetUp in Zagreb, Croatian startups developing solutions for caterers presented their products to caterers and found out what solutions are needed by hotel and restaurant owners. METRO and Crane thus enabled the connection of 12 startups with more than 70 Croatian restaurants, hotels and other caterers in order to provide Croatian startups with an insight into the needs of the HoReCa sector and thus help them to participate more competitively in the METRO Accelerator.last_img read more

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Researchers map ‘self-regulation’ to develop comprehensive definition

first_imgShare on Facebook Pinterest Email The commonly used word in psychology and education is often misunderstood, according to Burman and his co-authors Professor Christopher Green and Professor Stuart Shanker, because it is used to convey several different interrelated ideas.“It’s a hot new topic. And we knew that the inconsistency in academic literature was a problem. But we didn’t know how big an issue it was until Professor Shanker started hearing complaints from confused parents and teachers. To address this, we synthesized a simple description using new digital humanities methods developed in collaboration with Professor Green’s lab,” says Burman, who had previously spent five years serving as an advisor to PsycINFO, the American Psychological Association (APA)’s search engine.Briefly put, “learning ‘self-regulation’ involves learning how to monitor and manage your internal states, understanding what it feels like to be calm and alert, and so also learning to recognize when certain activities help you to return yourself to those states most easily, as well as what pulls you out of them,” according to the Faculty of Health researchers who delved into the concept in-depth.“Our aim was to show the range of technical meanings that influence the understanding of ‘self-regulation’ by various audiences,” notes Professor Shanker, a noted researcher on the topic and author of Calm, Alert, and Learning: Classroom Strategies for Self-Regulation.Shanker adds, “However, we were also able to go further to provide an overview of what can be said about self-regulation in psychology and, at the same time, urge caution on how different partial interpretations can alter the sense of the fundamental phenomenon.”For the study, the researchers examined the 447 possible interpretations of “self-regulation” and their interconnected meanings, focusing on how the APA defines the associated terms.The study revealed that self-regulation can be fully described using an easy-to-navigate map that charts the locations of all of the terms, and highlights the 88 most relevant among them. Modularity analysis also showed that everything could be reduced to just six broad conceptual areas. The authors then identified that these six areas could in turn be located along two broad and intuitive axes.The study, “On the meanings of self-regulation: Digital humanities in service of conceptual clarity,” is published online ahead of print in Child Development, the leading peer-reviewed journal. The resulting analyses showed how similar ideas–self-control, self-management, self-observation, learning, social behavior, and the personality constructs related to self-monitoring–are all interrelated.The next step, according to Burman, is to advance the method itself: “we intend to use a similar approach to break down the ways in which those meanings are used in the scientific literature, and connect them to the best-supported interventions that address the required needs in just the right way. When there are thousands of partially-conflicting studies, with new ones being published every day, you can’t just ‘read more.’ You need to approach the subject in a different way.” Share on Twittercenter_img The term “self-regulation” has started appearing in children’s report cards of late, but what it means is often unclear to parents. Thanks to three York University researchers, who have created a clear-cut definition for learning this important psychological concept, parents and teachers can now have a better understanding of what “self-regulation” means and how they can help their children develop that capacity.“My hope is that every parent whose child has had a meltdown in a mall, and every teacher who has to work hard every day to prevent something similar from happening in their classroom, will recognize the value of improving the understanding of why such a thing happens,” explains Jeremy Burman, lead author of a new study on self-regulation and a PhD candidate in the Department of Psychology.“Currently there is no widely accepted definition for self-regulation, but there exist dozens of competing perspectives with slightly different emphases,” says Burman. “Any one scientific study can address only a handful of these. And that means our understanding is badly fragmented.” Share LinkedInlast_img read more

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The brains of people with autism process facial expressions of emotion differently

first_imgShare Share on Facebook Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often have difficulty recognizing and interpreting how facial expressions convey various emotions – from joy to puzzlement, sadness to anger. This can make it difficult for an individual with ASD to successfully navigate social situations and empathize with others.A study led by researchers at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and Columbia University used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the neural activity of different brain regions in participants with ASD, compared with typically developing (TD) participants, when viewing facial emotions.The researchers found that while behavioral response to face-stimuli was comparable across groups, the corresponding neural activity between ASD and TD groups differed dramatically. Email LinkedIncenter_img Share on Twitter Pinterest “Studying these similarities and differences may help us understand the origins of interpersonal emotional experience in people with ASD, and provide targets for intervention,” said principal investigator Bradley S. Peterson, MD, director of the Institute for the Developing Mind at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. The results have been published online in advance of publication by the journal Human Brain Mapping.While there is a general consensus that individuals with ASD are atypical in the way they process human faces and emotional expressions, researchers have not agreed on the underlying brain and behavioral mechanisms that determine such differences.In order to more objectively look at how participants in both groups responded to a broad range of emotional faces, the study used fMRI to measure two neurophysiological systems, called valence and arousal, that underlie all emotional experiences. “Valence” refers to the degree to which an emotion is pleasant or unpleasant, positive or negative. “Arousal” in this model represents the degree to which an emotion is associated with high or low interest.For example, a “happy” response might arise from a relatively intense activation of the neural system associated with positive valence and moderate activation of the neural system associated with positive arousal. Other emotional states would differ in their degree of activation of these valence and arousal systems.“We believe this is the first study to examine the difference in neural activity in brain regions that process valence or arousal between typically developing individuals or those with ASD,” said Peterson, who is director of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Keck School of Medicine of USC.To address this question, the researchers enrolled 51 individuals with ASD and 84 TD individuals. Each participant was shown a range of facial emotions in order to assess these two aspects of emotional experience, based first on their responses, both valence (is the emotion pleasant or unpleasant?) and arousal (degree of interest or attention).The responses were then separately correlated with neural activity in order to identify systems related to valence and arousal. While the valence was remarkably similar between the two groups, the corresponding neural activity for arousal differed prominently.There was much more neural activity in participants with ASD when they viewed arousing facial emotions, like happiness or fear. The TD individuals, on the other hand, more strongly activated attentional systems when viewing less arousing and more impassive expressions.“Human beings imbue all experiences with emotional tone. It’s possible, though highly unlikely, that the arousal system is wired differently in individuals with ASD,” says Peterson. “More likely, the contrast in activation of their arousal system is determined by differences in how they are experiencing facial expressions. Their brain activity suggests that those with ASD are much more strongly affected by more arousing facial expressions than are their typically developing counterparts.”The scientists concluded that the near absence of group differences for valence suggests that individuals with ASD are not atypical in all aspects of emotion processing. But the study suggests that TD individuals and those with ASD seem to find differing aspects of emotional stimuli to be relevant.last_img read more

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Threats against children increase when mothers separate from abusive partners

first_imgShare on Facebook Pinterest LinkedIn Email Mothers who separate from their abusive partners are four times more likely to report threats to take or to harm their children than those who stay in the relationship, a study by Sam Houston State University found.In “Indirect Abuse Involving Children During the Separation Process,” Brittany Hayes, Assistant Professor at the College of Criminal Justice, said that victims of intimate partner violence continue to suffer from abuse after separation, but few recognize the indirect abuse of children during the process.“When we look at the separation process, we know that women are at an increased risk of violence and sexual assault,” said Hayes. “But we need to keep an eye out for other forms of abusive behavior that are not as obvious.”center_img The study is based on 339 abused mothers from the Chicago Women Health Risk Study, which surveyed over 700 women who used health care services at a Chicago area clinic over a 10-month period. According to the study, nearly one-quarter of abusers threatened to take the children away from their mothers, whereas 8 percent threatened to harm the children. Threats against the children are attempts to further control the victim, even after the abusive relationship has ended, the study found.Although separation may provide additional avenues for abused women in the legal process, it may lead to new avenues of exploitation through child custody issues. Courts rely on “the best interest of the child” standards, which recommends joint custody unless there is evidence of child abuse. The current system makes it hard to balance the safety of the abused victim with the custody and visitation rights of the father.Therefore, the study suggests it is important for child custody workers to screen for child abuse beyond physical violence, as controlling behaviors may pre-date the separation and have been found to be a causative factor in victimization. Behaviors that child custody workers should screen for include the abuser encouraging negative beliefs among the children, undermining the mother’s authority, or using the children to frighten the mother. The study also recommends the creation of Family Justice Centers that can be used for supervised visits or safe exchanges of children in cases involving intimate partner violence. Family Justice Centers also can provide resources for the victims of abuse, including talking to an advocate, filing police reports, meeting with the prosecutor, creating a safety plan, obtaining medical assistance and getting information on housing or public assistance.“There is still much work that needs to be done on improving services for those involved in a child custody case where there is a history of intimate partner violence,” Dr. Hayes said. Share on Twitter Sharelast_img read more

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Behavioral problems in youths are associated with differences in the brain

first_imgEmail Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Pinterest LinkedIncenter_img Share Young people with behavioural problems, such as antisocial and aggressive behaviour, show reduced grey matter volume in a number of areas of the brain, according to a new study published in JAMA Psychiatry.The researchers from the University of Birmingham found that, compared to typically developing youths, those with behavioural problems show grey matter reductions specifically within the amygdala, the insula, and the prefrontal cortex.These brain areas are important for decision-making, empathic responses, reading facial expressions and emotion regulation; key cognitive and affective processes that are shown to be deficient in youths with behavioural problems. The article combined brain imaging data from 13 existing studies including 394 youths with behavioural problems and 350 typically developing youths, making it the largest study on this topic.Dr Stephane De Brito, lead author of the paper, explained, “We know that severe behavioural problems in youths are not only predictive of antisocial and aggressive behaviour in adulthood, but also substance misuse, mental health problems and poor physical health.”“For that reason, behavioural problems are an essential target for prevention efforts and our study advances understanding of the brain regions associated with aggressive and antisocial behaviour in youths.”However, a number of unanswered questions still remain in the field. For example, the extent to which these structural differences in the brain are associated with environmental factors (such as smoking/substance abuse during pregnancy and maltreatment in early childhood) is still poorly understood.Dr Jack Rogers, Research Fellow at the University of Birmingham, said, “There are a lot of questions still outstanding. For instance, prospective longitudinal studies are needed to assess if these structural differences are present early in life and if they persist over a longer period of time.”“In future research, it will also be important to examine if these brain differences, and the affective and cognitive processes they are involved in, can be influenced by therapeutic interventions to promote a good outcome in adult life.”Dr De Brito noted, “Some of those important questions will be addressed in the context of a large multisite study we are involved in. This research will be carried out on children and adolescents from seven European countries to examine the environmental and neurobiological factors implicated in the development of behavioural problems in male and female youths.”last_img read more

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PET imaging with special tracer can detect and diagnose early Alzheimer’s disease

first_imgShare on Facebook LinkedIn Email Pinterest Share on Twittercenter_img Share The effort to find ways to detect and diagnose preclinical Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has taken a big step forward with the use of positron emission tomography (PET), a “nuclear medicine” for imaging processes in the body, when PET is used with a special ‘tracer’ that binds to the amyloid plaques in the brain that are a characteristic cause of AD.The paper explaining the use of PET and Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) to diagnose AD appears in the current special issue of Technology and Innovation- Journal of the National Academy of Inventors, Volume 18, Number 1 (all open access), which is devoted to the evolution of neuroimaging.“Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia and is pathologically characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques containing amyloid-beta (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles [in the brain],” said Ann D. Cohen, professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. “[PiB] is thioflavin-T (ThT) derivative, a small molecule known to bind to amyloid proteins…. Imaging AD pathology, using amyloid PET imaging agents such as PiB, has several potential clinical benefits, including preclinical detection of disease and accurately distinguishing AD from non-AD dementia in patients with mild or atypical symptoms.” The PET system detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a tracer that is introduced into the body on a biologically active molecule. A variety of tracers are already used with PET scanning. A tracer used along with PET to explore the possibility of cancer spreading to secondary sites is one of the most common types of PET scan in use in standard medical care, although many other radioactive tracers are used in PET to image the in-tissue concentration of other types of molecules.According to Cohen, using biomarkers such as PiB to better understand cognitive deficits seen in normal aging, as opposed to those in AD, has become critical since the advent of AD prevention trials. Her review focuses on the use of PiB-PET across the spectrum of AD from the earliest PiB studies where PiB retention in the brain was higher in patients when amyloid plaques were present. Prior to these findings, only post-mortem studies could confirm amyloid plaques.“PiB retention in AD patients was generally most prominent in cortical areas and lower in white matter areas of the brain, consistent with post-mortem studies of Aβ plaques in the AD brain,” explained Cohen.According to Cohen, amyloid imaging, alone or along with other biomarkers, will “likely be critical to the identification of subjects at risk for AD and future decline.” She added that what has become clear from amyloid imaging studies is how early in AD “the full burden of amyloid plaques begins to develop.”Major challenges ahead, she noted, include finding ways to determine the earliest signs of amyloid accumulation, associating amyloid accumulation with cognitive impairments, and determining whether early amyloid deposition will lead to clinical dementia.These challenges will likely require us “to continue to focus on cognitively normal elderly and the detection of the earliest signs of amyloid deposition, along with markers of neurodegeneration…to determine the clinical significance of pre-symptomatic pathology,” concluded Cohen. “As anti-amyloid clinical trials begin in asymptomatic people, it will be critical to effectively identify the earliest changes in amyloid deposition and the significance of such changes on downstream neurodegenerative processes.”last_img read more

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Lower weight in late life may increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease

first_imgShare Share on Facebook Email LinkedIn Share on Twittercenter_img This investigation explored the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and beta amyloid levels in the brains of the first 280 participants to enroll in HABS, who were ages 62 to 90, cognitively normal and in good general health. Participants’ initial enrollment data included medical histories; physical exams; testing for the presence of APOE4, the major genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s; and PET imaging with Pittsburgh compound B (PiB), which can visualize amyloid plaques in the brain.After adjusting for factors including age, sex, education and APOE4 status, researchers found that having a lower BMI was associated with greater retention of PiB, indicating more extensive amyloid deposits in the brain. The association was most pronounced in normal-weight participants, who were the group with the lowest BMI in the study. Analysis focused on APOE status revealed that the association between lower BMI and greater PiB retention was particularly significant for individuals with the APOE4 gene variant, which is associated with increased Alzheimer’s disease risk.Researchers hope that future studies will explain the mechanism behind the association between lower BMI and increased amyloid levels. “A likely explanation for the association is that low BMI is an indicator for frailty – a syndrome involving reduced weight, slower movement and loss of strength that is known to be associated with Alzheimer’s risk,” says Marshall, who is an assistant professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. “One way to get closer to determining any cause and effect relationship will be following these individuals over time to see whether their baseline BMI does predict the development of symptoms, which we are doing in HABS, and eventually investigating whether maintaining or even increasing BMI in late life has an effect on outcomes. Right now, we’re also studying whether BMI is associated with any other clinical and imaging markers of Alzheimer’s disease.” Pinterest Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have found an association between lower weight and more extensive deposits of the Alzheimer’s-associated protein beta-amyloid in the brains of cognitively normal older individuals. The association — reported in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease — was seen in particular among individuals carrying the APOE4 gene variant, which is known to increase the risk of Alzheimer’s.“Elevated cortical amyloid is believed to be the first stage of the preclinical form of Alzheimer’s disease, so our findings suggest that individuals who are underweight late in life may be at greater risk for this disease,” says Gad Marshall, MD, of the MGH and BWH Departments of Neurology, senior author of the report. “Finding this association with a strong marker of Alzheimer’s disease risk reinforces the idea that being underweight as you get older may not be a good thing when it comes to your brain health.”While the concept of a preclinical version of Alzheimer’s disease is theoretical and not yet being used to guide clinical diagnosis or treatment, the current hypothesis involves three stages. Individuals at stage 1 are cognitively normal but have elevated amyloid deposits; stage 2 adds evidence of neurodegeneration, such as elevated tau deposits or characteristic loss of certain brain tissues, with no cognitive symptoms; and stage 3 adds cognitive changes that, while still in a normal range, indicate a decline for that individual. The current study is part of the MGH-based Harvard Aging Brain Study (HABS), designed to identify markers that predict who is likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and how soon symptoms are likely to develop.last_img read more

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How to tell if your boss is a psychopath – and what to do about it

first_imgPinterest Share on Facebook Share Being in business calls for a determined if not ruthless mindset, the ability to be confident and in control, and to be forceful, calculating, and a meticulous planner. Attributes that few possess. But there is one category of person that has them in abundance – the psychopath.Researcher Robert Hare estimates 1% of the general population fits the profile, though the percentage of CEOs might be four times that figure.Oxford University psychologist Kevin Dutton surveyed 5,400 people across a wide range of professions. He compiled a list of the top 10 jobs ranking highest for psychopathy. Top of the list? CEO, followed by lawyer, media personality, salesperson and surgeon. LinkedIncenter_img Email Share on Twitter While psychopathic individuals are more likely than other people to commit crimes, most of them manage to live successful lives, their psychopathic personality helping them along the way.The problem is, it’s the psychopathic boss who makes the culture and sets the tone for the way some organisations go about their business.Does the boss like to operate ethically, or do they skate around in the grey zone between ethical and legal? Or worse, do they like to step over the line into illegality if the risks are low and the benefits outweigh the legal liability?Those that work for such a boss can sometimes get caught in the trap, so set on not upsetting the boss, they develop a case of “ethical blindness”. These workers are not usually conscious of being unethical, it is simply that management has created an environment in which ethics are not much considered, allowing otherwise decent people to become established in that behaviour.Put an otherwise good person in a toxic environment, perhaps one created by a psychopathic boss, and that person will find it very difficult to resist the slide into ethical blindness and harmful behaviour.What to watch forPsychologist Phillip Zimbardo, best known for his Stanford Prison Experiment, came up with a set of social processes that “expedite evil”. Reading them is a reminder for how we are all perched at the top of our own slippery slope:Mindlessly taking the first small step. Its easy when there is something to be gained and little to lose. Its the “thin edge of the wedge” that creates forward momentum. In business, you might be expected to cut a few corners as an acceptable part of getting the job done. As time goes by, the practice moves beyond “is this the right thing to do” to “can I get away with it?”, a transition that is easily made in a culture of ethical blindness.Dehumanisation of others. When tribal “us and them” thinking leads people to see outsiders as sub-human. The blood-soaked history of warfare shows the destructive potential of this thinking. When a boss tells everyone that this is war, that we must “smash the competition”, or “bury them” they are creating a hostile environment in which survival is linked to killing the enemy.De-individuation of self (anonymity). People who mask their identity are more likely to behave in anti-social ways because anonymity gives permission to behave badly. If a worker is an anonymous cog in a machine-like organisation, they feel less than human themselves, and so less governed by human decency.Diffusion of personal responsibility. Become swept up in the mob mentality (eg. lynch-mob), and you are capable of almost anything. Thousands of usually law-abiding Londoners became looters and arsonists during the 2011 riots because “everyone else was doing it”. A workplace with “the end justifies the means” culture makes it easy for people to do what everyone else is doing.Blind obedience to authority. When an authority figure like the boss orders you to do something it is difficult to refuse, particularly if not complying carries serious consequences. In the past, such disobedience could be fatal.Uncritical conformity to group norms. Norms exert a powerful influence over our behaviour, particularly if disobedience or being a nonconformist will get you fired from the organisation. In the evolutionary past, social exclusion was tantamount to death so our instincts are to conform.Passive tolerance of evil through inaction or indifference. As Edmund Burke noted, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing”. You don’t need to be a perpetrator, it’s enough to simply stand passively by.Bottom-up leadershipYou can still establish yourself as an ethical person in your own sphere of influence provided the boss is not diabolical. This is a form of bottom-up leadership that sets a good example for others to follow.When enough spheres of influence overlap, the culture changes. In the end, your best option may be to look for another job and exit gracefully. But don’t underestimate the power of collective action to create an ethical workplace.By David Tuffley, Senior Lecturer in Applied Ethics and Socio-Technical Studies., Griffith UniversityThis article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

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