Accidents Lead To DWI Charges

first_imgEast Hampton Town police made several arrests on misdemeanor driving while intoxicated charges this past week.A Springs woman was charged by police after allegedly striking a pedestrian on Three Mile Harbor Road early Sunday morning. Leydi Tubatan, 35, was driving a 2013 Toyota sedan when she struck another Springs resident, Edwar Correcha-Calderon, police said, near the 324 Club September 29.When friends leaving the club found Correcha-Calderon, he told them he had been struck by a car, which had pulled up ahead of the group. They approached the car and a physical altercation allegedly broke out between them and Tubatan, whom they told an officer they were trying to hold until police arrived. Tubatan was struck in the face.Complaining of back pain, Correcha-Calderon was taken to Stony Brook Southampton Hospital after police arrived, where he was treated and released.After allegedly failing roadside sobriety tests, Tubatan was arrested on a drunken driving charge. The Toyota she was driving was impounded by police.At her arraignment Monday morning she was notified that her license would be suspended for a year for refusing a breath test at police headquarters. A longtime resident of the town, she was released without bail.Ryan Fagerland, 32, of Amagansett, was also arrested on a DWI charge this past week after an accident. He was driving a 2005 Mini Cooper Sunday at around sunset, and as he was shifting gears, reportedly told police he lost control of the car on Abrahams Landing Road near Bendigo Road, veered into the oncoming lane of traffic, and crashed head-on into a 2014 GMC being driven by a Manhattan woman. There were no serious injuries reported, though both cars sustained extensive front-enddamage.At police headquarters, a breath test conducted showed the percentage of alcohol in Fagerland’s blood to be .16 of one percent, well over the .08 mark that defines intoxication. He was released after being arraigned Monday morning.A third man arraigned on misdemeanor DWI charges that morning was Matthew Murphy, 46, of Westhampton. An officer pulled him over in downtown Montauk Sunday evening for allegedly running a stop sign and failing to signal a turn. After reportedly failing sobriety tests, the officer told Murphy he was under arrest. According to the police, Murphy shoved the officer. Two officers assisted in handcuffing Murphy, who is now facing an additional misdemeanor charge of resisting arrest. He was released without bail.Backing into the stockade fence in the parking lot of Springs Tavern with a 2005 Ford Escape proved to be the prelude to the arrest of Glenn Specht, 47, of Northwest Woods, a little before midnight Friday, September 27, according to town police. Specht also performed poorly on sobriety tests.Charged with drunken driving, he was taken to police headquarters where his breath test produced a blood alcohol content reading of .22 of one percent, enough to raise the charge to aggravated driving while intoxicated, police said. That charge remains at the misdemeanor level, as Specht did not have a prior DWI conviction in the past 10 years.Held overnight, he was arraigned the next morning and released without bail. A Montauk man, Xen Angelidis, 26, was driving a 2016 Nissan pickup a little after midnight September 25 when he was pulled over by East Hampton police on Flamingo Avenue for allegedly swerving across lane lines. After making the stop, Angelidis was charged with DWI as a first-time misdemeanor offense. He was released after being arraigned the following morning without having to post bail.t.e@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Dolphin Drilling’s fleet to get AGSL software

first_imgAsset Guardian Solutions Ltd (AGSL) has been awarded a contract by Dolphin Drilling AS of Tananger, Norway.This is the first contract awarded to AGSL by a Norwegian-based company.Asset GuardianAGSL will provide Dolphin Drilling AS with Asset Guardian, a fully configurable process software management tool which is, according to the company, designed to meet the needs of Rig Control and Automation Systems. AGSL says that by using Asset Guardian, Dolphin Drilling AS will centralize its software and data storage into a single repository, which will enhance workflow management, minimize risk and speed recovery of software and data in the event of software failure, reducing any impact on drilling operations.Asset Guardian software will be installed on Dolphin Drilling’s entire fleet, which consists of nine mobile drilling units. According to AGSL, it will provide a more effective method of managing the data associated with each programmable system, and a safer, more secure means of storing critical software.Improving communications with worldwide fleetDolphin Drilling’s drilling vessels and semi-submersible rigs operate in remote waters where access to the Internet is limited, AGSL explains. Therefore, to improve communications between these remote locations and its onshore facilities, AGSL says it will also provide AGSync, a solution designed for the oil and gas industry that makes it possible for data and files to be seamlessly synchronized between remote locations and the company’s master server, which is located at the company’s headquarters in Tananger, Norway.The contract from Dolphin Drilling AS is the most recent in a string of awards from oil and gas operators and suppliers to AGSL. These awards include GDF Suez, which will use Asset Guardian to manage all of its process control-related software assets associated with the Cygnus Project, the largest undeveloped gas discovery in the Southern North Sea in 25 years. BP, which uses Asset Guardian on many of its global production facilities, selected Asset Guardian for the company’s Clair Ridge and Quad 204 projects. Operators Woodside and INPEX also use Asset Guardian for their projects and developments in Australia.“We are very excited to be working with Dolphin Drilling AS, not only because it represents our first contract in Norway, but because it is the second major contract we have been awarded by a drilling company,” said Peter Beales, Business Development Manager for AGSL.[mappress mapid=”884″]last_img read more

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Update: Efforts to Self-Float Hanjin Aqua Unsuccessful

first_imgAttempts of the South Korean shipping company Hanjin Shipping to refloat M/V Hanjin Aqua that ran aground off Sangiang Island, Indonesia on December 4 have proved to be unsuccessful, according to an update from the ship’s owner.Namely, last week the vessel’s owners tried self-floating with the ship’s own engine and tug boats, but it could not be pulled out.As these efforts failed, Hanjin Shipping is now arranging for the salvage of the vessel via salvage companies.The Panamanian-flagged containership Hanjin Aqua ran aground onto the rocky shallows while sailing to Jakarta from Port Adelaide, at Sunda Strait. The ship is reported to be carrying 2,303 TEU of cargo including hazardous waste.M/V Hanjin Aqua sustained damage to its hull and breaching some of its ballast compartments that started taking in water causing the ship to develop a list. However, the ship is not in danger of sinking.“In respect to refrigerated cargo please note that the vessel is safely powered and reefer containers are operating as normal,” Melbourne-based shipping company ANL informed.The container ship has been replaced by a substitute vessel on the service, which has been normalized.The 2012-built container ship features 62,448 in DWT and is 249 meters long.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Why cutting operational carbon is the priority

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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​ALS begins wind farm work

first_imgFrom August through to October, ALS project managers will be on the ground in Sweden overseeing the daily operations relating to vessel discharge, transfer to storage, management of components in storage, re-load from storage and transfer to the wind farm site.  ALS will handle 275 components – comprising nacelles, gears, hubs, blades and towers – with a total weight of over 14,300 tonnes. The largest component measures 15.78 m x 5.8 m x 5.52 m and tips the scales at 78 tonnes.The company has been involved in several renewable energy projects in Scandinavia over the last 18 months, including the project management of 74,053 tonnes of wind farm equipment from port to site over a period of nine months. For this project, 1,515 components were discharged from vessels, stored and then reloaded to transport; in total 149 complete turbines were delivered to five different wind farms.   “Coordination and detailed planning were key to this overall project with six transport companies working together to achieve 1,500 deliveries to the sites,” said ALS.Earlier this year, ALS boosted its renewable energy portfolio with the establishment of a joint venture with NorSea  – Elevon. The companies will combine their strengths in large and complex project logistics and offshore supply logistics. abnormal-loads.comlast_img read more

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Tackle ‘credibility vacuum’, regulator told

first_imgThe Law Society has urged the Solicitors Regulation Authority to address what it calls ‘any credibility vacuum’ in the regulator’s attempts to build better relations with smaller firms.The regulator is consulting the profession about how to improve its reputation among small firms, which complain of burdensome regulations and bearing the brunt of disciplinary action.The Society’s response says the SRA should offer more advisory support as a precursor to enforcement. It also questioned the absence of any ‘safe harbour’ device. Chancery Lane also disapproves of the ‘incessant revision’ of the SRA Handbook, which has had 12 editions since September 2011, and the same individual having to take on multiple roles to satisfy regulatory objectives.‘We would again emphasise the need for the SRA to be available to meet with small firms or sole practitioners if they are experiencing difficulties in complying with regulation,’ said the response. ‘The SRA should take a proactive, positive and practical approach to regulating small firms.’The SRA announced its new focus in November last year and has admitted some small firms and sole practitioners believe it does not understand the problems of running a small business.last_img read more

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Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) releases five-year strategic plan

first_imgThe Caribbean Court of Justice PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad, CMC – The Trinidad-based Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) has unveiled a five-year strategic plan that will among other things strengthen its bonds with people of the region and advance the rule of law.The 2019-24 strategic plan with the theme, “Unlocking Potential,” includes a new mission, vision and values for the Court, which was developed by the judges and staff.“Our intention is to take bolder strides and to be more innovative; to better empower decision makers; to communicate more effectively both internally and with all our stakeholders; to work more meaningfully with partners and justice sector bodies in the region; to strengthen our bonds with the Caribbean people and to advance the rule of law,” said CCJ President, Justice Adrian Saunders.He said that the implementation of the strategic plan will help to move forward, the CCJ, which was established in 2001 to replace the London-based Privy Council as the region’s final court. It also serves as an international tribunal interpreting the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas that governs the regional integration movement.Registrar and CCJ Chief Marshal, Mrs. Jacqueline Graham, said that the theme of “Unlocking Potential” through the implementation of the strategic plan will also encourage a more streamlined monitoring and review of the Court’s systems.“These systems must, at all times, be characterized by high levels of accountability, transparency, efficiency and fairness, and they must be harnessed by the Court’s governance principles,” she added.The CCJ’s strategic plan contains six strategic issues, broken down into 14 goals and 41 strategies that will be used to effectively fulfil the CCJ’s aim of unlocking the potential of the organization.The six strategic issues include communication; independence and accountability; high performance environment; equality, fairness and integrity in promoting the rule of law, organizational capacity for caseload growth and enhanced regional system capacity and performance.The five-year plan also includes a new mission, vision and values for the Court, which was developed by the judges and staff.In a statement, the CCJ said that the plan is already guiding its operations and had been used in the development of the Court’s work plan for this year.“The process of implementing the strategic plan will be iterative, each unit will assess the results of their efforts on an ongoing basis and will adjust their work plans to ensure that results are aligned with the stated goals.”The development of the strategic plan was made possible with support from the JURIST Project, a judicial reform initiative funded by the Canadian government and implemented by the CCJ.The strategic plan was developed using a collaborative process with input from representatives of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), the Regional Judicial and Legal Services Commission (RJLSC), the CCJ Trust Fund, regional judiciaries, bar associations, law schools and faculties of law.last_img read more

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Importance of effective Higher Education in Africa

first_imgAccording to UNESCO and World Bank statistics, Africa still lags 20% behind the world average in university enrollment rates.On the flip-side though, employers have voiced their concerns with graduates lacking the practical experience they required and criticized universities for not being involved enough in in ensuring their students and research meet their respective region’s demand.African governments have invested heavily into getting more students into university over the past decades. Enrollment rates across the region doubled in the decade between 2000 – 2009, rising from 2.3 million to 5.2 million and continuing to grow.The African Union Summit in June 2015 decided to prioritise higher education in Africa’s development plan with a declaration that suggested that member states, ‘Strengthen their support and investment in higher education in order to develop a critical mass of high level intellectual capital, and promote youth employability through entrepreneurship skills and innovation.’“In order for the region to truly benefit from the fruits of ongoing infrastructure development and stop the constant outsourcing of jobs requiring high-skilled labor outside of the continent, African businesses and entrepreneurs need to be able to draw on a well-educated, skilled local workforce,” an article on the Djembe Communications website suggested.Speaking at a press conference on the sidelines of the just concluded Conference on Higher Education, Policy and Research in Djibouti, Baloesa Abdi Sheikh, CEO,  Northern Advocacy Organization and Cynthia Ichaminya, Member of UNESCO Youth Forum expressed their views on the importance of effective higher education in Africa.last_img read more

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Gambia charges renegade generals with desertion

first_imgFormer president of Gambia Yahya JammehThe Gambian army has filed desertion charges against two renegade generals who went into exile with former president Yahya Jammeh last year, the force told AFP on Wednesday.General Umpa Mendy and General Ansumana Tamba sought refuge in Equatorial Guinea alongside Jammeh in January 2017 after his brutal 22-year rule came to an end.Major Lamin Sanyang, an army spokesperson, said the pair were “charged with desertion of duty contrary to the Gambia Armed Forces Act”, and would appear before a general court martial on April 4.Mendy was in personal charge of protecting the mercurial former leader, while Tamba was the head of his presidential guard.The top brass left the country on board Jammeh’s plane bound for exile in Equatorial Guinea on January 21, 2017.The former president’s refusal to step down after losing an election the month before to unknown businessman Adama Barrow pushed neighbouring countries to the brink of a military intervention, until Jammeh conceded at the 11th hour.The generals’ arrival caused controversy as airport staff waved them through without attempting to detain them for questioning.Elements of The Gambia’s armed forces are known to have maintained support for the former president and a number of soldiers are on trial on treason and mutiny charges for plotting to overthrow the country’s newly elected government.The country is still being secured by soldiers deployed by the Ecowas regional grouping until reform of the security services is complete.last_img read more

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