A Better You: Steer clear of those wasted carbs during lockdown

first_imgOver the past three weeks I have been writing about program design, how to train at home and how to plan your routine but it is probably time to start thinking about cutting your calories. All the movement you do in a day adds up to steps and calories burnt but now that you have found yourself confined to an apartment, small dwelling or even cluster home, the total amount of energy expenditure in a day won’t be half of what you are normally doing. This is why you need to follow a daily set exercise routine, morning abs, core…last_img read more

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Patients push limits for clues to chronic fatigue syndrome

first_imgBETHESDA, Md.  |  Researchers hooked Zach Ault to medical monitors as he slowly climbed onto a gym bike. An invisible disease is sidelining this once avid athlete and he knew the simple exercise would wipe him out — but Ault was pedaling for science.Chronic fatigue syndrome is one of medicine’s most vexing mysteries. Now doctors at the National Institutes of Health are using volunteers like Ault for a unique study that pushes their limits in search of what’s stealing all their energy.“I’ve tried to exercise my way out of this multiple times and I’ve put myself in deeper pits every time,” said Ault, 36, of Paducah, Kentucky, as he began a nearly two-week stint at the research-only hospital outside the nation’s capital.“Chronic fatigue is kind of like they took the stopper out of the energy reserve tank,” and no amount of sleep replenishes it, he said.Up to 2.5 million Americans are estimated to have what is known officially as ME/CFS — it stands for “myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.” Its hallmark is profound fatigue, lasting more than six months, that’s made even worse by any type of exertion. Among other symptoms, patients also tend to have difficulty staying upright or cognitive trouble often described as a “brain fog.”Many go undiagnosed, misdiagnosed or dismissed by skeptical doctors. Decades after it was first recognized, scientists don’t know what causes it. There are no approved treatments, or even tests to help diagnosis — and no way to predict who will recover and who will have a severe case that leaves them debilitated, even bed-bound, for years.“The ignorance about the condition just vastly dwarfs what we know about it,” said Dr. Walter Koroshetz, director of NIH’s National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, which is leading the research.The NIH has more than doubled funding — to more than $14 million — for scientists around the country to unravel the biology of ME/CFS since 2015, when the influential Institute of Medicine decried “a paucity of research.”Part of the trouble is that varied symptoms make it hard to compare patients. A patient advocacy group called Solve ME/CFS Initiative is preparing to open a registry where patients can send in medical information and blood and saliva samples to help scientists expand research.And illustrating the desperation for answers, nearly 500 patients have called seeking to enroll in NIH’s own study that is putting a few dozen under the microscope, with a barrage of sophisticated tests few hospitals can offer under one roof.Like many such patients, Ault’s disease struck following a run-of-the-mill infection in 2017. He’d been training for a half-marathon but after a little time off to recover, he tried to resume his runs and couldn’t. His diagnosis came after months of tests for other explanations.“His body had literally hijacked him and it wasn’t going to allow him to push through,” said Anne Ault, his wife.Ault, a father of three, was missing his kids’ sporting and school activities, even his nightly wrestle with his young son. He had to cut back his job, in the ministry, to half-days. When 16 hours of sleep a day made no difference, his wife, a pharmacist, hunted research opportunities.Ault fit the bill for the NIH study, which is focusing on people who came down with the disease after an infection, of any sort, within five years. That initial infection is long gone but maybe, the body’s normal reactions to illness went into a destructive tailspin.“You’re really capturing the disease at a specific point in time,” in its crucial early stages, said Sadie Whittaker, scientific director for the Solve ME/CFS Initiative. “No one has studied such a very specific population to such depth before.”There are some clues. Earlier studies have found brain inflammation in patients, and nervous system abnormalities that might explain why they feel worse upright than lying down. The immune system seems to be on chronic alert. Then there’s the energy drain. Just last month, Cornell University researchers reported that patients’ key immune cells don’t make energy properly.The NIH study is looking for more clues. It starts with a week-plus hospitalization for blood and genetic tests, brain scans, a spinal tap, sleep tests, a check of gut bacteria. Scientists pore over the results before deciding who to invite back for a longer and more rigorous visit.“Go as far as you can, work as hard as you can,” NIH physical therapist Bart Drinkard told Ault as he climbed onto the exercise bike.Cells, in particular little factories inside cells called mitochondria, use oxygen and nutrients to create energy. While Ault pedals, scientists can measure how his leg muscles use oxygen, and see if that’s different than in a healthy person.Afterward, doctors fit a special cap on Ault to track electrical activity in his brain, and then sent him to spend the night in an air-tight chamber. Pipes draw out the room’s air for analysis. How much oxygen is used and carbon dioxide is produced tells how much energy Ault is using, minute by minute.“We can calculate every molecule. It’s the cleanest air we have in the hospital,” said NIH’s Kong Chen, a metabolism specialist. “We’re figuring out how his body adjusts to an exercise load, or a stress load.”Researchers are clear: The study doesn’t offer any treatments, although the hope is to find targets to eventually develop some. But Ault says it did help to learn about the disease and tricks to conserve his energy and pace himself “so I can try to stay as healthy as possible without such bad consequences.”“It’s hard not knowing if I’m going to recover, if or when,” he said. Until research has an answer, he’ll “hope for the best but live for right now.”___The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content. In this Nov. 20, 2019 image from video, Zach Ault is fitted with an EEG cap which uses electrodes to track the electrical activity of his brain, at the National Institutes of Health’s hospital in Bethesda, Md. Ault has ME/CFS, what once was called “chronic fatigue syndrome,” and is part of a unique study aiming to uncover clues to how the mysterious disease steals patients’ energy. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio) 1 of 4 In this Nov. 20, 2019 image from video, National Institute of Health researchers test patient samples in Bethesda, Md. The NIH has more than doubled funding — to more than $14 million — for scientists around the country to unravel the biology of ME/CFS, also known as chronic fatigue syndrome, since 2015, when the influential Institute of Medicine decried “a paucity of research.” (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)center_img In this Nov. 20, 2019 image from video, Zach Ault retrieves bottled water through air-locked hatch inside a “metabolic chamber” where he is spending the night at the National Institutes of Health’s hospital in Bethesda, Md. The airtight room allows scientists to measure how much oxygen is used and carbon dioxide is exhaled to figure out how much energy Ault’s body is is using. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio) In this Nov. 18, 2019 image from video, Zach Ault of Paducah, Ky., is connected to medical monitors during an exercise test at the National Institutes of Health’s hospital in Bethesda, Md. Ault has ME/CFS, what once was called “chronic fatigue syndrome,” and is part of a unique study aiming to uncover clues to how the mysterious disease steals patients’ energy. At center is Brice Calco, a research trainee with NIH’s National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)last_img read more

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Local hoops teams in the mix in postseason play

first_img Perhaps the greatest thing the New York Giants accomplished with their recent Super Bowl victory is to remind us all that in any sport, regardless of the level of play, no expected outcome is ever absolute. For the majority of the local high school basketball teams entering this winter’s postseason, there will be similar mantras associated with their respective title pushes. While a chosen few local teams enter the postseason expected to emerge as champions, the rest are left to try to equal the task accomplished by a Giants team very few people picked to become the eventual champion heading into the National Football League playoffs. It’s time for the champions to emerge, and this winter there are quite a few local teams that believe it is their time to shine. Boys hoops With the start of the NJSIAA state tournament still a few weeks away, a handful of local teams will turn their attention to the Shore Conference Tournament this week. While Neptune has certainly earned the top seedwith its stellar 16-4 run through the regular season, the general consensus is that this year’s SCT is one of themore wide-open fields in recent memory. The Scarlet Fliers will certainly be tough to beat, but fewhoops fans around the Shore would be shocked to see someone else holding up the SCT trophy in the end. Locally, Christian BrothersAcademy is the highest-seeded team as the Colts (15- 6) look to make another run in a tournament where they always seem to be playing their best ball. First-year head coach Geoff Billet’s team will have a firstround bye this week and will host the winner of the Central-Toms River South first-round game later this week. Middletown South, in the midst of its strongest season in a long time, is the next-highest local seed, as the Eagles enter the tournament at the seventh seed. They, too, will have a first-round bye, but they’ll be severely tested in the Round of 16 when they host a Red Bank Regional team (15-5) that is very dangerous. Led by the high-scoring tandem of Will Sanborn (17.7 points per game) and Matt Pebole (16.5 ppg), the Bucs have the potential to make a run deep into this tournament, just like the Eagles. Regardless of the first-round outcomes, this looks to be the marquee match-up of the second round. The Keyport Red Raiders have been enjoying a special season as well, playing to a 16-5 mark and a second-place finish in the B Central race (won by Asbury Park). Their efforts earned them the 18th seed in the SCT and a first-round matchup at Rumson-Fair Haven (13-7) tonight. The winner gets second-seededMonsignor Donovan (15-5) on Friday. St. John Vianney is the only other local boys team that qualified, earning their spot with a 75-59 win over Brick on Saturday to get back to the .500 mark (11-11) on the cutoff date. After starting the season 3-8, SJV has won eight of 11 since then and will host Point Boro (10-9) in their SCT opener tonight. The winner gets Neptune on Friday in the second round. AlthoughCBAis always a safe bet in predicting the SCT, and while one could certainly make a case for Middletown South emerging as the surprise champions, it is anotherMonmouth County teamthat gets the pick here. Look for Monmouth Regional, a red-hot teamthat nobodywants to play right now, to emerge victorious, beating Freehold Township in the final. Looking ahead to the state tournament, three of the same teams will be looking for a sectional crown once those tournaments get under way on Feb. 26. CBAwas awarded the 10th seed in the loaded Non-Public South A tournament and will travel to Toms River to take on Monsignor Donovan for their opener on Feb. 26. The winner will take on secondseeded Paul VI two days later. Holy Cross is the heavy favorite in this bracket. Keyport got a bit more respect with a third seed in the Central Jersey Group I bracket, giving thema first-round bye. They will host the winner of the Dunellen-Create Charter first-roundmatch-up on Feb. 28. Middletown South is the top seed in the Central Jersey Group III bracket and will host the winner of the Hopewell Valley Freehold Borough first-round matchup on Feb. 28. It will be interesting to see how the Eagles respond to being the favorite in a tournament they would have been happy to simply qualify for in recent seasons. Should the Eagles make a run at a title, they may very likely have to get through two of the Shore’s best teams (Monmouth Regional, seeded fourth, and Neptune, seeded second) to do it. A rematch with RBR is also possible, should both teams reach the semifinals. Girls hoops St. John Vianney enters the SCT as the favorite after putting together a typically brilliant 19-3 season. The Lady Lancers will host the winner of the Southern- Ocean first-round game on Friday. Should SJV play the type of defense is has displayed throughout the season, the Lancers will be very tough to beat. The Raritan High School girls team is also hoping to make a run at the SCT title, and based on some strong recent play, they could be a sleeper pick in this tournament. Raritan will play the winner of the Lacey-Jackson Liberty first-round game on Friday, with a likely match-up with second-seeded Colts Neck looming in the quarterfinals should they win. Middletown South’s girls are the 11th seed in the SCT and will host the No. 22 seed, Brick Memorial, tonight in their first-round game. The Eagles (13-5) are another solid team capable of knocking off some quality teams, and will take on Howell in the second round with a win tonight. That leaves the Mater Dei girls (13-7), who were awarded the 15th seed in the SCT and a first-roundmatch-up with Toms River North in Middletown tonight. With a win, the Seraphs will get the first shot at knocking off Colts Neck in the second round. While there are certainly a number of quality teams that have proved themselves to be capable of winning this tournament title, St. John Vianney has consistently been the conference’s best team this winter.And with a history of excelling in this event on their side as well, the Lancers are the pick here to win yet another SCT title, beating a familiar foe, Rumson-Fair Haven, in the final. However, it certainly wouldn’t be crazy to pick Raritan to earn a spot in the final as well. As expected, SJV also got the top seed in the Non-Public South A tournament and will take on the winner of the Holy Spirit-Bishop Ahr first-round match-up. Raritan is the fifth seed in the CJ Group II tournament, and will face Hillside in the first round on Feb. 25. The winner will take on fourth-seeded Shore Regional in the second round. BY DOUG McKENZIE Correspondent last_img read more

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Sharapova rags-to-riches journey resumes in Stuttgart

first_imgPalace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Siberia-born Sharapova first picked up a racquet at the age of four in Sochi, where her Belarus-born parents had settled after escaping the deadly clutches of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster.Spotted by Martina Navratilova, she was encouraged to move to Nick Bollettieri’s Florida academy, the proving ground of Andre Agassi and Monica Seles.Father Yuri and the seven-year-old Maria left for the US in 1994 with just $700 (644 euros) to their names.Yuri took odd jobs like dishwashing to finance his daughter’s dreams although visa restrictions meant mother Yelena was back in Russia, separated from her daughter for two years.When Sharapova was nine, the mighty IMG group spotted her talent and funded the $35,000 fees required for the Bollettieri school.ADVERTISEMENT Wimbledon celebrityShe made her professional debut at 14 in 2001 and by 2003 reached the world top 50. She won her first tour titles in Japan and Quebec.Then in 2004, her Wimbledon final triumph over Williams made her an overnight international celebrity.One year later, she became the first Russian woman to be ranked number one in the world while, in 2006, she won her second major at the US Open.But in 2007 and 2008, she began her long, on-off battle with shoulder trouble.She still had time to win the 2008 Australian Open before a second shoulder injury kept her off tour for the second half of the season, including missing the US Open and Beijing Olympics.A 10-month absence from the sport, as she recuperated from surgery, saw her ranking slip to 126, but she was back in 2012, capturing the French Open to become the 10th woman to complete a career Grand Slam and adding Olympic silver to her resume that year.Her 2014 French Open title was another high after a dispiriting injury low.More injury troubles followed before the bombshell announcement of her positive test for meldonium at the 2016 Australian Open — where she fell in the quarter-finals to Williams, her last match before her suspension.Serena rivalryWith Williams, she has endured her most testing rivalry — on and off the court.The two famously exchanged personal insults over their love lives when Sharapova began a two-year romance with Bulgarian player Grigor Dimitrov, a rumoured previous suitor of the American. Presidency bid needs ‘deep reflection’ – Sara Duterte LATEST STORIES Duterte’s ‘soft heart’ could save ABS-CBN, says election lawyer Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Wildlife rescuers asked to turn over animals to DENR MOST READ Ex-Bulacan town vice mayor, village chief shot dead Taal Volcano evacuees warned against going home Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Bulacan town gears up for biggest cookie jar Racela on TNT loss to Ginebra: ‘We gave up’ Sharapova had previously been engaged to former Los Angeles Laker star Sasha Vujacic.She may have been unlucky in love, but Sharapova hit the jackpot in her commercial affairs.She made almost $30 million in 2015, according to Forbes, with $23 million of that coming from endorsements and once signed a contract extension with Nike worth a reported $70 million.“Beauty sells. I have to realise that’s a part of why people want me. I’m not going to make myself ugly,” she said.She owns luxury homes — one in Florida, one in California — and is making a lucrative career as an entrepreneur.In 2012, she launched her own line of candy, ‘Sugarpova’, and during her suspension, signed up for a Harvard Business School course.But she insists that retirement was never an option despite her absence meaning her world ranking has disappeared, leaving her at the mercy of wildcards into tournaments.Those free-passes have irked many of her contemporaries already suspicious of the Russian’s aloofness.“I know I am respected,” says an unconcerned Sharapova. CBB Ai-Ai delas Alas on Jiro Manio: ‘Sana pinahalagahan niya ang naitulong ko’ On Wednesday in Stuttgart, the 30-year-old will return from a 15-month doping suspension to open the next chapter.When she takes to the court to face Roberta Vinci, it will be to the consternation of many opponents and the relief, albeit privately, of a women’s tour left flagging by the absence of Serena Williams, probably Sharapova’s only serious rival in the arena-filling business.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnSharapova shot to international fame as a giggly 17-year-old Wimbledon winner in 2004 — the third youngest player to conquer the All England Club’s famous grass courts.She would go on to win the Australian and US Opens while claiming two titles at the French Open, despite famously likening her movement on Roland Garros’s crushed red brick to a “cow on ice”. Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite STUTTGART, Germany — From the shadow of Chernobyl’s nuclear wasteland to international super-stardom and from penniless arrival in the United States, without a word of English, to a fortune of $200 million.It may sound like the stuff of Hollywood dreams, but the story of Maria Sharapova is a testament to the power of one individual to make it, whatever the odds, whatever the controversy, whatever people think.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

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Half centuries for Hope, Powell

first_imgCHITTAGONG, Bangladesh (CMC): Shai Hope and Kieran Powell struck half-centuries on the opening day of the two-day tour match here yesterday as the Windies geared up for next week’s first Test against Bangladesh. Opting to bat first against a Bangladesh Cricket Board XI, the Windies ended the day at the MA Aziz Stadium on 303 for six, with Hope top-scoring with 88 and Powell getting 72. Roston Chase chipped in with 35, while both Shane Dowrich and Shimron Hetmyer got 24. Playing in their only warm-up match before the opening Test, the tourists lost captain Kraigg Brathwaite cheaply for six with the score on 11 in the seventh over of the day. However, Hope and Powell then came together in a 163-run-seconds’ wicket stand to lead the Windies recovery. Hope faced 112 balls and struck 10 fours and three sixes, while the left-handed Powell was more circumspect, counting six fours and a six in a 142-ball knock. Hope retired hurt and Powell fell to a catch at the wicket off left-arm spinner Fazle Mahmud, paving the way for Chase, Hetmyer and Dowrich to spend valuable time at the crease. The Windies will face Bangladesh in two Tests starting next Thursday at the Zahur Ahmed Chowdhury Stadium here in Chittagong. The tour also includes three One-Day Internationals and three T20 Internationals. SCOREBOARD WEST INDIES 1st Innings *K Brathwaite b Shafiul 62 K Powell c Zakir Hasan b Fazle Mahmud 72 S Hope ret. hurt 88 S Ambris b Nayeem 17 R Chase lbw b Rubel 35 S Hetmyer c Rishad Hossain b Nayeem 24 +S Dowrich c Zakir Hasan b Soumya Sarkar 24 R Reifer batting 14 K Paul batting 18 Extras (lb3, nb2) 5 TOTAL (6 wkts, 86.3 overs) 303 To bat: J Warrican, D Bishoo, S Gabriel, K Roach, S Lewis, J Hamilton. Fall of wickets: 1-11, 2-174, 3-200, 4-239, 5-270, 6-271. Bowling: Shafiul 10-3-23-1, Rubel Hossain 10-2-40-1, Ebadat Hossain 8-0-36-0, Robiul Haque 7-0-21-0, Nayeem Hasan 26-3-104-2, Rishad Hossain 15.3-2-55-0, Fazle Mahmud 5-1-11-1, Soumya Sarkar 5-1-10-1. BCB XI – Rubel Hossain (captain), Soumya Sarkar, Zakir Hasan (wk), Mizanur Rahman, Fazle Mahmud, Ebadat Hossain, Shadman Islam, Nazmul Hossain Shanto, Nayeem Hasan, Shafiul Islam, Robiul Haque, Mohammad Mithun, Rishad Hossain. Umpires: Masudur Rahman, Gazi Sohellast_img read more

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Funding for security sector reform likely to be dispersed year end

first_imgFunding for Guyana’s revised Security Sector Reform Action Plan (SSRAP) could be dispersed by the end of the year, Foreign Affairs Minister Carl Greenidge revealed on Wednesday.The Minister who met with media operatives to provide an update on the recent State visit to the United Kingdom (UK), said talks surrounding assistance for crime and security was on top of the agenda.Greenidge who also holds the portfolio for Vice President gave his assurance that the coalition Government is keen on reactivating the security assistance mechanism.“I believe that that exercise will be completed before year end and there will be arrangements for some parts of those funds to be dispersed before the end of the year. I am very sure that that is the intention and the plan,” he said, when asked to provide a timeframe.The Minister also made reference to former top UK military officer, Russell Combe, who is currently in Guyana to assist with the implementation of the SSRAP which is part of a UK funded initiative aimed at improving the security sector here.Greenidge said, “The visit takes place at a critical juncture of Guyana’s development and at an equally critical one in UK’s political and economic evolution.”The UK had slashed the amount of money it would have provided to a revisedForeign Affairs Minister Carl Greenidge (centre), Director General of the Foreign Affairs Ministry Audrey Waddell (extreme right) and another Ministry officialSSRAP to Guyana because its priority was shifted from security to infrastructure.The project which began in 2007 was scrapped in 2009 after the British Government had requested to have oversight of the programme to ensure that there was ‘value for money’.The former Government had disagreed with the manner in which the British Government had wanted the programme to be run, claiming that Britain had sought to intrude upon Guyana’s sovereignty.However, the British Government said the Government of Guyana had submitted a different proposal which had focused on Police modernisation rather than a holistic approach to reform. The intention was to build a workable basis for improving national security while reducing crime in Guyana.Government believes that once implemented, Guyana’s security sector will be significantly strengthened and hopefully this will lend to a reduction in the number of illicit activities that takes place.President David Granger has said too there is need for a stronger Police Force, one that is better equipped with all tools necessary to function adequately.last_img read more

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Man granted bail on ‘smoking weed’ charge

first_imgA man who was intercepted by Police Officers for allegedly smoking weed (marijuana) was on Monday granted bail when he appeared before Magistrate Judy Latchman.Gavin Hickson, 46, of 146 Alexander Street, Kitty, Georgetown, originally pleaded guilty to the charge when it was read to him at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts.The charge stated that on May 19, 2017, at Kitty Public Road, Hickson smoked cannabis (marijuana).However, the court was in for a morning of laughter as the defendant interrupted Police Prosecutor Shawn Gonsalves as he was reading the facts to “clarify to you (Magistrate Latchman) what really happen”.According to the defendant, he was not intercepted at Kitty Public Road, but rather at Alexander Street, Kitty.The man explained that he was in the company of other men who were smoking which is “not where the thief men them and so does be”, when Police ranks came up to him and accused him of smoking ‘a joint of weed’, which was next to him on the ground.According to Hickson, he was not smoking the weed, but as it was next to him, he admitted ownership and, as such, was arrested.After his explanation, Magistrate Latchman entered a not guilty plea for him.She then placed him on $20,000 bail.However, the defendant told the Magistrate that he entered a guilty plea because he has no family in the country to bail him.As such, Magistrate Latchman reread the charge to which the defendant again pleaded guilty.She explained to him that the penalty attached to his offence was one to three years’ imprisonment along with a fine of $6000 to $15,000.Upon hearing this, the defendant told the Magistrate that he wished to again change his plea to a not guilty one as “I gone get one of me pardna to bail me out”.Magistrate Latchman granted his request and again placed him on $20,000 bail. The defendant is scheduled to return to court on June 12, 2017.last_img read more

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Saguaro Resources will drill 28 wells in Northeast B.C.

first_imgCALGARY, A.B. – Saguaro Resources has announced they plan to ramp up capital spending in 2017 and 2018 in Northeast B.C.On Thursday, Saguaro Resources announced they had closed the placement of $50 million of secured notes, and recently expanded its syndicated revolving credit facility from $65 million to $105 million.“With this funding we plan to ramp up our capital spend in 2017, 2018 and beyond. Our high free condensate yield and low drilling and completion costs provide very attractive economics at current strip prices. Saguaro’s goal is to more than double our 2016 exit production rate of 12,000 boe/d by the end of 2018” said Stacy Knull President & CEO.- Advertisement -In 2017, their capital program will include drilling 28 wells (24 of which will be brought on-stream) and the expansion of its processing facility to 100 MMcf/d.Saguaro had estimated proved reserves of 84 MMboe and estimated proved plus probable reserves of 270 MMboe at year end 2016. This represents a 140% increase in proved reserves and a 150% increase in proved plus probable reserves since the end of 2015.last_img read more

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Datebook

first_imgThe Earth Beneath Us: What Our Local Landscapes and Rocks Can Tell Us, 2-3:30 p.m., National Park Service Visitor Center, 401 W. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks. Call (805) 370-2301. Science Day 2007, 2-4 p.m., Central Library, 630 W. 5th St., Los Angeles. Free. Call (213) 228-7000. Beatles tribute concert, featuring Ticket to Ride, 6 p.m., Rancho Simi Community Park, 1765 Royal Ave., Simi Valley. Free. Picnic baskets OK. Call (805) 584-4400. “Curious George” screening, 8 p.m., Mae Boyar Park, 130 Kanan Road, Oak Park. Free. Call (818) 865-9304. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” 8 p.m., Will Geer Theatricum Botanicum, 1419 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Topanga. Tickets: $15-$25. Call (310) 455-3723. SATURDAY Book sale, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Granada Hills Library, 10640 Platt Ave. Call (818) 368-5687. Plant adventures hike, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Sooky Goldman Nature Center, 2600 Franklin Canyon Drive, Beverly Hills. Meet at Wm. O. Douglass Outdoor Classroom. Bring food and drink. Call (310) 858-7272. Ocean Expedition, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Natural History Museum, 900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles. Free with admission. Call (213) 763-3348. Mail Datebook entries – including time, date, location and phone number – to Daily News City Desk, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365; fax (818) 713-0058; e-mail dnmetro@dailynews.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Italian duo vying to sign Spurs star

first_img Vlad Chiriches Juventus and Inter Milan are both keeping tabs on Tottenham defender Vlad Chiriches.According to sources in Italy, the Serie A pair are on the lookout for defensive recruits and have identified the 24-year-old as a viable January option.Chiriches arrived from Steaua Bucharest in an £8.5m deal last year but his future at White Hart Lane seems uncertain.He has started just 18 Premier League games in nearly 18 months at the club and has made just three appearances for Tottenham under new boss Mauricio Pochettino, the last of which ended with him gifting Besiktas a late penalty in the Europa League.Now Inter and Juve are reportedly considering loan offers for the Romania international as they bid to ease injury problems at the back. 1last_img read more

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