Volero coach Terzic says Pomi ‘deserved to win’

first_imgVolero Zurich may have bowed down to Pomi Casalmaggiore in the semifinals of the FIVB Women’s Club World Championship, but its head coach Zoran Terzic gave his support to the Italian champions as they go into the finals against defending champions Eczacibasi Vitra Istanbul.“They deserved to win,” said Terzic after Volero lost in four sets, 27-25, 25-23, 25-17, 25-23, Saturday at Mall of Asia Arena. “One simple reason: They played with much more courage in service and attack. They played well defensively. They definitely deserved to win.”ADVERTISEMENT Pomi scored on 54 of its spikes, four more than Volero did, and it had 12 points off blocks, three more than the Swiss club.Volero, winner of the bronze medal in the 2015 tournament, will have to face VakifBank Istanbul in the battle-for-third match on Sunday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentPomi, meanwhile, is the defending European champions. But the team is a first-timer in the world stages and would go up against defending champions Eczacibasi Vitra Istanbul in the gold medal round.If Terzic could praise Pomi, he could not forget to pinpoint his team’s problem. MOST READ Pomi coach Caprara returns to WCWC finals a proud man We are young EDITORS’ PICK Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway View comments Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Team ‘Trabaho’ scores championship title at the last leg of Smart Siklab Saya Manila Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 “Volero is a team that has problems with these kinds of situations, we played very well until today,” said Terzic, whose team topped Pool B in the group stages after going 3-0. “We have to work on our volleyball and our psychology to be better for the next competition.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more

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Last male rhino in Malaysia dies

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Politics, Governance, Mammals, Rainforests, Rhinos, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife A Sumatran rhino affectionately known as Tam died May 27 following months of poor health.Tam was the last male Sumatran rhino known to survive in Malaysia. One female of the species is now living in Malaysia.When he was captured in 2008, researchers hoped he would contribute to efforts to breed the critically endangered species in captivity. Tam died without reproducing. Tam, the last known male Sumatran rhino in Malaysia, died May 27 after months of declining health.“It is with heavy hearts that we share the tragic news that Tam, Malaysia’s last male Sumatran rhino, has passed away,” the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA), one of the organizations caring for Tam, announced via social media. “We will share more details in due time, but right now we need some time [to] mourn his passing.”Only a single female rhinoceros, Iman, now survives in the Southeast Asian country.Apart from Iman, the entire global population of the critically endangered Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) now survives in Indonesia; the wild population in the island of Sumatra and in the Indonesian part of Borneo is estimated to number between 30 and 80 individuals. Another seven live in captivity at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia’s Way Kambas National Park, and a female was recently captured in Indonesian Borneo as part of an effort to greatly expand captive-breeding efforts in that country.Kretam, or Tam for short, was captured in a palm oil plantation in Sabah, Malaysia, by a team of wildlife experts in 2008. Image courtesy of the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA).Tam was believed to be about 30 years old at the time of his death, well into old age for his species, according to wildlife officials from the Malaysian Bornean state of Sabah. Since April, he exhibited an abrupt decline in appetite and alertness, and displayed indications of multiple organ failure.The rhino had been receiving round-the-clock veterinary care at the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary in Sabah’s Tabin Wildife Reserve, where he had lived since his capture in August 2008.Tam’s relocation from a palm oil plantation to the sanctuary brought hopes that he could contribute to efforts to breed his species in captivity. He died without having reproduced; Tam’s sperm proved to be of poor quality, and the females held at the Tabin facility also suffered reproductive pathologies.“I remember so well when Tam was captured and the high hopes everyone had that he could be the founding member of a successful captive breeding program in Sabah, and join the then-international efforts involving the US and Indonesia,” said Susie Ellis, executive director of the International Rhino Foundation, in a statement. “Sadly, those hopes were repeatedly dashed over the next decade by a series of incidents, some sociopolitical, some biological, and some simply bad luck.”Tam, pictured here in 2010 at the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary. Image by Jeremy Hance for Mongabay.Malaysia’s sole remaining hope for producing new rhinos now lies with a much-delayed effort to artificially inseminate one of Iman’s eggs using sperm from a proven breeder at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary.However, Iman has also showed signs of poor health, suffering a ruptured tumor in her uterus in December 2017. And Indonesia has refused to allow sperm to be transferred out of the country, requiring that Iman’s eggs be sent instead.“What Indonesia wants is that everything happens here, nothing comes out of Indonesia,” said Indra Eksploitasia, director of biodiversity conservation at Indonesia’s environment ministry on the sidelines of a May 27 press conference in Jakarta.John Payne, head of the Borneo Rhino Alliance, told Mongabay last week that he was angry at the lack of interest from parties that had agreed to pursue collaborative efforts in ensuring the survival of the rhino population in Malaysia.“The numerous missed opportunities to conduct actions to save the world’s most endangered terrestrial mammal genus from extinction is nothing short of irresponsible,” Payne said.According to Indra, Indonesia has submitted a proposal regarding the egg transfer, and is awaiting a reply from Malaysia. “The ball is now in Malaysia’s court,” she said.“We’re sorry to hear the news,” Indra said of Tam’s death. “We’re working so that the same fate doesn’t happen with the rhinos in Indonesia.”Correction: This story was updated May 28 to correct the spelling of Indra Eksploitasia’s name.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

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SA woman conquers Seven Summits

first_imgMandy Ramdsen at the top of the world. At 07h45 on 22 May 2010, Mandy Ramsden was on top of the world. Literally. The South African mountaineer had just reached the 8 848-metre summit of Mount Everest. And she had plenty to be excited about. Not only is she now the second South African woman to climb Everest, she is also the first South African – indeed, African – woman to have climbed the Seven Summits, the highest peaks on each of the world’s seven continents.The first South African woman to climb Everest was Cathy O’Dowd, who reached the top on Ian Woodall’s controversial first South African Everest expedition in 1996, during which cameraman Bruce Herrod died. O’Dowd went on to climb Everest from the north side in 1999, becoming the first woman in the world to summit from both sides.Ramsden, a Zimbabwe-born single mother of four, has been working to claim the Seven Summits for five years. Since conquering Africa’s Mount Kilimanjaro in 2006, she has ticked off Mount Elbrus in Europe (2006), Aconcagua in South America (2006), Carstenz Pyramid (Puncak Jaya) in Australasia/Oceania 2007, Denali (Mount McKinley) in North America (2008), Vinson Massif in Antarctica (2009) and now the Big E.A perfect summitEverything went perfectly for the Adventure Consultants team, led by veteran New Zealand guide Mike Roberts and made up of Ramsden, fellow South African Tony Hampson-Tindale and Irishman James Haydock. After a stay down the valley in the village of Periche, enjoying the oxygen-rich air of the lower altitude and recovering from their acclimatisation programme, the team moved back to base camp on 11 May.Waiting for the weather window that would allow them to start the climb, the team focused on their preparation, visualising the climb ahead, fitting and testing their oxygen masks and regulators, familiarising themselves with the process of changing oxygen bottles, and experimenting with various combinations of headgear and warm clothing. Finally, on 19 May, they got the green light and made their way up through the Khumbu Icefall for the last time.On 21 May the team arrived at their final camp on the South Col, at 7 935 metres less than a thousand metres short of the summit. After a few hours rest and rehydration Ramsden and team leader Roberts left the South Col at 22h00. Although it was snowing lightly they could see the stars above – conditions looked good.They radioed in at the Balcony, roughly the half-way point in terms of height gain, and then made their way along the snowy southeast ridge to the South Summit Rocks, reaching the South Summit as dawn was breaking. After changing their oxygen bottles they were ready for the final push. At 06h00 the first team member, James Haydock, stood on the summit. Roberts and Ramsden, accompanied by Pemba Choti, on his sixth summit and Passang Bhote, on his third, topped out just under two hours later.Record-breakersOn the summit with them was another new record holder: Jordan Romero, a 13-year-old American from Big Bear, California, and the youngest to ever climb Everest. Romera, climbing with his father and three sherpa guides, climbed the mountain’s northeast ridge from Tibet because China has no age restrictions for Everest climbers. Those attempting to climb the south side from Nepal must be a minimum of 16 years old. The previous record for the youngest summiteer was held by Temba Tshering of Nepal, who summited at the age of 16 in 2001.After the obligatory photo shots in her South African-made Cape Storm ASR high altitude down suit, Ramsden and the rest of the Adventure Consultants team returned to the South Col for the night, before descending to Camp 2 the next day. They awoke to falling snow the next morning but, undeterred, were the first team to leave camp and begin the strenuous task of trail-breaking down to base camp. They are all now safely back at the camp, refreshed, clean, well fed – and celebrating.South Africans on the mountainIt was a good climbing season for South African mountaineers on Everest. A day after Ramsden stood on the world’s highest peak, five members of the South African Adventure Dynamics team, and team leader Sean Disney, summited from Everest’s north side. It was a particularly poignant occasion for Disney and team member Vaughan de la Harpe, both also Seven Summiteers – exactly four years ago they summited Everest from the south side.Three climbers from the Adventures Global team, led by South African Ronnie Muhl and comprising both South Africans and Australians, summited on 23 May with two more reaching the top on the 24th. Muhl himself, who had climbed Everest from the north side in 2007, decided to turn back before the summit.To date 424 climbers have summited Everest in 2010, with two fatalities. A new record for the number of ascents was set by the 50-year-old Apa Sherpa, leader of Eco Everest Expedition 2010, who now has 20 summits under his belt.How high is Mount Everest?China and Nepal have finally agreed that the height of world’s highest mountain is 8 848 metres – the height of its summit snows. The Chinese previously argued that it should be measured by its rock height, 8 844 metres.That said, the mountain is growing taller all the time, thanks to the collision of tectonic plates, so they might both be wrong. In May 1999 an American team used GPS technology to record a height of 8 850 metres. This figure is now used by the US National Geographic Society, although it has not been officially accepted by Nepal.last_img read more

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Wind change sees Bali flights cancelled

first_imgMount Agung . Jetstar and Qantas have canceled all flights from Bali this afternoon because of new information on the movement of the volcanic ash cloud.Both airlines had been in a race against forecast wind changes and the imminent explosive eruption of Mount Agung to clear passengers stranded on the holiday island.The two airlines will still operate 11 rescue flights this morning and early afternoon.Neither airline is taking passengers to Bali.However, Virgin Australia is continuing to operate rescue flights.Read: Bali passengers may be able to seek refund.More tremors occurred yesterday and overnight and the time between them is decreasing while their strength is increasing according to the Indonesian seismic reports.A major escalation of the eruption is expected at any time.However, there has been a significant reduction in the amount of ash coming from Mount Agung prompting some officials to comment that the eruption may be over.But on Twitter, noted volcanologist Dr Janine Krippner said that “this does not mean it is over.“Fluctuations in activity are a normal part of the life of volcanoes,” Dr Krippner said.Indonesia’s Volcanology and Geological Disaster Mitigation Centre also warned that a more violent eruption remains likely.Devy Kamil Syahbana, of the PVMBG, told Reuters: “We cannot predict whether it will be bigger than 1963, but according to our evaluation the potential for a full-scale eruption is still high.”In 1963, the Mt Agung eruption killed more than 1600 and lasted over a year.last_img read more

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Yes, I will go to the Web 2.0 Conference

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Ok, this morning’s post was silly. Now here’s a serious one. I will go to San Francisco this October, for two reasons. Firstly to attend the Web 2.0 Conference (why should I miss out on all the fun!). Secondly to get a job in America, so my family and I can live there. I’d made up my mind before I read Steve Jobs’ Commencement address to Stanford University, but his inspiring words sealed the deal. It’s time I quit complaining and started really working towards my dream. As Steve Jobs said:“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.” Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#web richard macmanuscenter_img Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Coming Soon to a Google Apps Near You: Wikis

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… It looks like Google will shortly be adding a wiki to their web office application suite. Google acquired JotSpot, a provider of hosted wikis, last October, and signs now point to a re-launch of the service as Google Wiki. Google Blogoscoped noticed that “jotspot” is now a Google Apps service code, and if you try to log in to the service you’re treated with a rather poorly-sized Google Wiki logo.Google said in July that it would be adding JotSpot to Google Apps, so this doesn’t come as much of a surprise. The Google Operating System blog speculates that the launch will be timed with an announcement at this weekend’s Office 2.0 event in San Francisco.Last week, Richard MacManus wrote that the core products of a web office suite, are email, calendar, word processing, spreadsheets and presentation. Google, which this year acquired two companies working on presentation apps, will soon offer a suite that has all of those components. By adding wiki support to Google Apps, the company will be extending their web office with a product that could only be delivered on the web (remember, Richard’s web office definition said that an online office package must extend “the functionality of desktop office suites … by using Web Native features.”)Certainly Google Apps is not as comprehensive as Zoho’s suite, but adding wikis and presentations will put it on firm footing in the web office wars and extends it into areas that Microsoft Office does not tread.center_img josh catone 1 Tags:#web#Web Office Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

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Building Mobile Analytics Solutions With Design Thinking

first_imgWhen we design for mobile analytics, we need to apply the mobile mindset to all facets of user interactions, not just what we do when we are online but also what we do offline. In my first blog‌ of the series, I discussed the importance of embracing a mobile design philosophy that will be unique to each of us and the environments we work in.This is important because our design philosophy will be the guiding light when best practices alone may not be enough to help us navigate in uncharted waters. I want to expand on this idea and further articulate what it looks like.The mobile analytics design places an emphasis on how our mobile products or solutions can help drive growth and profitability—that is the success criterion that matters most. Therefore, as I discussed in my design thinking blog, the customer (our users) becomes not only the focal point of our design but the main ingredient for our design formula. Here are some concepts of design thinking that I apply to mobile analytics.Integrated mobile solutions are a mustWe must strive for integrated mobile and mobility solutions where each part completes the mobile user experience as a whole. We don’t want to build fragmented pieces that make up a mobile stack or reflect PC-era design practices.Getting closer to mobile users is the only wayWe need to get closer to current or potential customers (mobile users) by involving them actively in the process from day one. They must touch and play with the first prototype as much as they would during the testing phase. Continuous feedback should be the lifeblood of any mobile design and development effort.The empathy principle is key to smart designWe need to apply what I refer to as the “empathy principle” to design thinking. I define it as a practice that involves opening up our nerve endings, so to speak, and increasing our awareness, so we can feel what it’s like to be in the actual users’ shoes. You can’t do that from behind a desk. You need to be right in the trenches, working side by side with the real customer in the same environment and under the same conditions. I see the empathy principle as a prerequisite for customer-centric products and solutions.Collective expertise gives birth to collective insightWe need to bring multidisciplinary roles together at the table in order to leverage the power of collective expertise that covers both technical and business know-how. All the members of our extended design team bring not only their subject matter expertise, but also their insight from their personal and professional experiences that go beyond their tenure in their current roles. Together, with collective expertise, we give birth to collective insight.Ambiguity is good for smart designWe embrace ambiguity as we look at the mobile user experience—sometimes starting from scratch—so we can explore new ideas that we would otherwise miss. Ambiguity, if guided and managed effectively, erases past biases and helps us start on a new page without any expected notions.If you ever want to see how this works, just watch a child play or work on a drawing. They’re as free when they start as they are when they stop. In the context of mobile analytics, inspiration can come from new mobile ideas as well as from traditional analytics artifacts.Fail early and often to learn fasterAnd most important of all, we must promote the philosophy of “fail early and often” by harnessing the power of rapid prototypes and delivering proof of concepts that resonate with and encourage feedback from mobile or “mobile-to-be” users. This means that, except maybe for the first meeting, all other subsequent interactions with our users must be accompanied by digital drafts that illustrate not only the look and feel of our design but also the functionality (the report or dashboard, for example).This last one is the closest to my heart because it often reminds me of a famous quote by Frank Lloyd Wright, “You can use an eraser on the drafting table or a sledgehammer on the construction site.”Stay tuned for my next blog in the .You may also like the Mobile BI Strategy series on IT Peer Network.Connect with me on Twitter @KaanTurnali, LinkedIn and here on the IT Peer Network.A version of this post was originally published on turnali.com and also appeared on the SAP Analytics Blog.last_img read more

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Updated: Researchers rally around science advocate convicted in Egypt

first_img *Update, 13 September, 5:15 p.m.: A new letter of support for Serageldin includes 90 Nobel Prize winners, 20 heads of state, and some 150 scholars. More information can be found here. The court will hear his appeal next week. Here is our original story from 11 August:Scientists, engineers, and others are hoping an Egyptian court will reconsider a prison sentence given to one of the nation’s most prominent science advocates. Last week, in a surprising outcome, an Egyptian judge sentenced Ismail Serageldin, founding director of Egypt’s Library of Alexandria, to 3.5 years in prison for financial misdemeanors. Serageldin has appealed the 31 July verdict, and this week more than 180 scientists, engineers, physicians, and public figures issued a declaration of support (in Arabic) on his behalf.Serageldin directed the library, also known as the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, and its 14 affiliated research institutes and museums, from 2001 until he retired this year. Previously, he worked as an economist at the World Bank and chaired the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research, which helps steer a global network of research facilities.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)After the 2011 revolution in Egypt, several employees at the library accused Serageldin and three colleagues of misusing public funds. Of 118 charges, the judge dismissed all but three: not giving some employees enough work, improperly canceling life insurance policies, and improperly renting out cafeterias at the library. Supporters of Serageldin expected the Court of Misdemeanors in Alexandria to also toss out those charges. But the judge instead sentenced Serageldin to prison; his colleagues received 6- to 18-month terms. In a statement posted on Facebook on 1 August, Serageldin wrote (in Arabic) that he had “adhered to all local and international laws.” Serageldin expects to be back in court next month for a hearing on his appeal. Meanwhile, he remains free.Farouk El-Baz, a space scientist at Boston University and member of the library’s advisory board, is optimistic that the appeals court will overturn the conviction. “It will be OK,” he says. “His hand is clean and his conscience is clear.” D.shennawy/Wikimedia Commons By Erik StokstadSep. 13, 2017 , 5:15 PMcenter_img Ismail Serageldin Updated: Researchers rally around science advocate convicted in Egyptlast_img read more

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India beat England by 6 wickets in 4th ODI

first_imgIndia rode on stroke-filled half centuries from Suresh Raina (80) and Virat Kohli (86) as they recovered from an early jolt to post a comfortable six-wicket victory over England and take 4-0 lead in the five-match ODI series in Mumbai on Sunday.Chasing England’s modest total of 220 all out, Kohli and Raina combined well to put on a match-winning partnership of 131 in 113 balls to help India overhaul the target with 9.5 overs to spare at the Wankhede Stadium.Returning to the Wankhede Stadium, the scene of their famous triumph in the World Cup final on April 2, Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s men first put England on the mat with a clinically efficient bowling display after the visitors had gone off to a flying start of 39 in six overs.The modest target set by England, who were dismissed in only 46.1 overs, was not stiff enough to test the batting strength of the home team who wobbled at 21 for 2 and then 46 for 3 before Raina and Kohli took the game away from the tourists.Raina, who hit his 19th half ton in 129 games, departed at 171 but skipper Dhoni (15 not out) was cool as ever in the company of Kohli, who struck his 18th fifty in 68 ODIs, as the fifth wicket duo stitched an unconquered stand of 52 runs to pull India past the finish line in 40.1 overs.The home team, thus, kept themselves in the hunt for a 5-0 clean sweep in the series with the final ODI scheduled at Kolkata on October 25.It was, incidentally, the first-ever ODI victory for the hosts at this venue against England following defeats in the 1987 World Cup semi final and the 2001-02 bilateral series encounter.advertisementEarlier, India dismissed England for a modest total 220 in 46.1 overs after the visiting team had started in a bright fashion after opting to bat first on a slow surface.last_img read more

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