Spencer baseball crushes Colby

first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterCOLBY — Calvin Lenz allowed just one hit in five innings as the Spencer baseball team routed Colby 17-0 in a Cloverbelt Conference East Division matchup Thursday at Colby High School.Lenz struck out five, did not walk a batter, and had a double offensively for the Rockets (6-2, 4-1 Cloverbelt East), who pull into sole possession of second place in the conference.Colby drops to 4-2 overall and in the conference.Nate Neumann was 2-for-3 with three RBIs, and Jake Meyers, Mitch Susa, and Ryan Busse each added two hits for the Rockets.Spencer scored 10 runs in the top of the fifth inning to finish off the win via the 10-run rule.The Rockets play at Gilman on Friday.(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)Rockets 17, Hornets 0Spencer 104 2(10) – 17 13 1Colby 000 00 – 0 1 5WP: Calvin Lenz. LP: Morrow.SO: Lenz 5.Top hitters: S, Nate Neumann 2×3, 3 RBIs; Jake Meyers 2×3, RBI; Mitch Susa 2×4, 2B, 2 RBIs; Ryan Busse 2×4, 2 RBIs; Lenz 2B.Records: Spencer 6-2, 4-1 Cloverbelt Conference East Division; Colby 4-2 overall and Cloverbelt East.last_img read more

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Female birds get drabber when their males fool around

first_img By Kai KupferschmidtNov. 4, 2015 , 1:00 PM Bill Holsten The shining honeycreeper is a small, tropical bird found in Central America. In a new study, scientists compared the colors of almost 6000 species of birds. One conclusion: Birds that live in the tropics tend to be particularly colorful. Bill Holsten ‹› Bill Holsten Bill Holsten Birds display an astonishing diversity of plumage colors. Males are more colorful than females in some species (top row, left to right: Baltimore oriole, red-legged honeycreeper, and variable seedeater). But females look the same as males in other species In some species, males and females look very similar. One example is the golden-hooded tanager in this picture. center_img In many bird species, the males are more colorful than the females, as in these house finches. The male is on the left, and the female on the right. Bird species in which one male can mate with many females tend to have more colorful males. But the promiscuity has an even stronger effect on females, making them drabber. That’s one of the more surprising conclusions in a new study of more than half of all living species of birds, which also reveals that a bird’s size and breeding location has a strong influence on the extravagance of its plumage.“This paper is one of the most ambitious comparative studies ever conducted,“ says Geoffrey Hill, an ornithologist at Auburn University in Alabama, who was not involved with the work. But Richard Prum, an ornithologist at Yale University, says the paper is flawed because the team relied on pictures of birds in a book rather than observing them in the wild. “You couldn’t study animal pheromones with scratch-and-sniff recreations.”Most scientists believe that bright colors signal good health or a great immune system. But why are some bird species more colorful than others? That’s been tough to resolve because it is hard to quantify how colorful a plumage is, says Bart Kempenaers, an ornithologist at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen, Germany. “How do you compare bright red with bright blue or yellow? That is the problem we had to solve.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Kempenaers and his colleagues tried a new approach: scanning pictures. The scientists focused on passerine birds, a group that makes up more than half of all known bird species and that is sometimes known as perching birds for their arrangement of toes—three pointing forward, one back. The researchers scanned illustrations in the Handbook of the Birds of the World, the only book covering every known living bird species, and then used a computer program to quantify how colorful each bird’s plumage is.The tricky part was getting just one number that they could compare across species. For each bird, the scientists looked at six different patches of feathers (nape, crown, forehead, throat, upper breast, lower breast) and then identified the 1% of birds that were closest in color in the same patch. The more males, the higher the score for that patch. The researchers then calculated the average of the six patch scores for each bird. In essence, the scientists measured how “malelike” a bird appeared. But because male birds, in general, tend to be more colorful, that measure also works as a measure of how colorful a bird’s plumage is.Analysis of the data yielded several trends: Larger birds are more likely to be colorful, possibly because they are less likely to be eaten by predators and can afford to be conspicuous. Tropical birds also tend to be more colorful, an observation already made by Charles Darwin. “We can’t say with any certainty what’s driving it. But we can say with certainty it is a very strong and real trend,“ says James Dale, an ecologist at Massey Unviersity. Albany, in New Zealand, and one of the authors of the paper published online today in Nature.The authors noticed one more trend: In species where males mate with more than one female (called polygyny), male birds tend to be more colorful than in monogamous species. This was already known and it is seen as the result of strong competition between males for females. But the authors found that polygyny had an even stronger effect on females: It made them drabber. In monogamous species, males also get to choose females, so there is some sexual selection pressure on them to appear more beautiful. But males in many polygynous species basically take whatever they can get, Kempenaers says. “In these species, sexual selection is acting only on the men. For females there is just natural selection and that favors an inconspicuous plumage.”Tim Caro, an expert on coloration in animals at the University of California, Davis, says the paper is interesting because it looks at female ornamentation as well as male. “Usually most attention is focused on ornamented males,” he wrote in an email.Yet Prum, who has studied the evolution of avian plumage coloration, says that the generalizations arrived at in the study are meaningless, because evolution acts on individual lineages in different ways. For instance, he points out that the biggest passerine bird, the lyrebird from Australia, is large and polygynous, yet both males and females are also drab.Prum also argues that studying avian plumage color off prints is “scandalous,” because there are some aspects of bird coloration that birds can see, but humans cannot. These can only be captured by using a method called spectrometry on live birds or museum specimens, he says.The authors did measure more than 500 bird specimens in museums to test their technique. “The results were very similar whether we used handbook plates or museum skin data,” Dale says. Some information on color will not be picked up by the technique, he acknowledges. “But we compensate for that by having a very large sample size so that the results we get are still very biologically relevant.” The shining honeycreeper is a small, tropical bird found in Central America. In a new study, scientists compared the colors of almost 6000 species of birds. One conclusion: Birds that live in the tropics tend to be particularly colorful. Birds display an astonishing diversity of plumage colors. Males are more colorful than females in some species (top row, left to right: Baltimore oriole, red-legged honeycreeper, and variable seedeater). But females look the same as males in other species Bill Holsten Female birds get drabber when their males fool around Bill Holsten last_img read more

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Japan’s damaged x-ray satellite: Space scientists looking for clues

first_imgSpeculation about possible causes of an onboard explosion centers on a rupture of the helium tank for an x-ray detector cooling system, fuel leakage from the attitude control engines, and a battery malfunction. Takashi Kubota, JAXA program manager, said they are now analyzing the last transmissions of data received from the craft for clues as to what might have happened. He said the agency and its partners are striving to re-establish communications with the satellite as a first priority. They have 20 windows of opportunity to communicate each day and are sending commands hoping something gets through. At the same time they are gathering whatever clues they can from other sources about the attitude and condition of the craft. The agency has even asked the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan to train its 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope, located atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii, on Hitomi. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Tsuneta said that given the capabilities of the various instruments on the craft, “Astronomical researchers worldwide had extremely high hopes for this satellite, I think they would like it to be recovered no matter what it takes.” At a press conference in Tokyo today, officials of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) said that because of the difficulty of gathering information from the wayward Hitomi x-ray observatory they couldn’t say how long it might take to figure out what has gone wrong. A joint JAXA-NASA mission, Hitomi was launched 17 February and was still undergoing commissioning when normal communications were lost on 26 March. Originally called ASTRO-H, Hitomi carries a suite of instruments designed to detect x-rays and gamma rays emanating from black holes, swirling gases in galaxy clusters, and supernova remnants. Ground stations have intermittently picked up signals apparently from the spacecraft on four occasions, raising hopes that the main body of the craft might be intact. But the last of those glimpses of life was on 29 March. Ground visual and radar observations indicate that the craft has split into at least two pieces and is likely spinning. “At the moment, there is no evidence of a collision with space debris,” said Saku Tsuneta, director general of JAXA’s Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Sagamihara near Tokyo.last_img read more

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Lynx force decisive Game 5 vs Sparks in WNBA Finals

first_imgThe Lynx, who never led in Game 3, built as much as a 19-point lead in the third quarter. The Sparks rallied, but could never get closer than eight points late in the fourth quarter.“I just love the way we competed for 40 minutes,” said Moore. “Everybody was really locked in and trying to be the aggressor the whole time. We didn’t play a perfect game, but did enough to beat a really good Sparks team on the road.”In the first quarter, Lynx point guard Lindsey Whalen used her arm in a chopping motion to foul Sims in transition. Whalen was called for a common foul but it was reviewed and upgraded to a Flagrant 1. Sims stayed down on the floor but was fine and would stay in the game. Still, that physical play seemed to set the tone for the Lynx, who were a different team than in a 75-64 loss two days earlier.“That was the beginning of the game,” Sims said. “It’s over now. Our mindset is focused on getting better and concentrating on Game 5.”Sims declined not to talk about that play, but it was clear it energized the Lynx.“Each team has the mindset that you don’t want to give your opponent anything easy,” Lynx coach Cheryl Reeve said. “It’s kind of interesting, Magic (Johnson) is sitting there and I suspect he was thinking of when that was just a foul. Not review, flagrant, just a foul. It was a playoff foul. We have this new term of unnecessary. Well that’s kind of subjective. We thought it was necessary that she not get the layup off.“With the new rules and the world we live in, it was deemed unnecessary.”PARTY OF FIVEThe Lynx didn’t have a good performance overall from their starters in Game 3 and two of them — Whalen and Seimone Augustus — didn’t score. On Sunday, four of the five starters scored in double figures. Moore, Rebekkah Brunson, Fowles and Augustus combined for 65 points and 43 rebounds. Whalen scored four points, but added eight assists.FREE THROW DISPARITY No more menthol cigarettes: New ban on tobacco, vape flavors Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Trump to designate Mexican drug cartels as terrorist groups MOST READ ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims LATEST STORIES Argentine bishop appears at court hearing on abuse charges Minnesota Lynx forward Maya Moore, left, drives to the basket against Los Angeles Sparks forward Nneka Ogwumike during the first half in Game 4 of the WNBA basketball finals, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)LOS ANGELES — Sylvia Fowles and the Minnesota Lynx weren’t about to let their season end in Los Angeles.The WNBA MVP helped the Lynx force a decisive fifth game in the WNBA Finals by scoring 22 points and grabbing 14 rebounds as Minnesota beat Los Angeles 80-69 on Sunday night. It’s the second consecutive year that these two teams will play a deciding game in Minnesota for the crown.ADVERTISEMENT “Advantage? No, we’re back in Game 5. We wanted to make sure we came out and we played well,” Fowles said.Minnesota, which is trying for its fourth title in seven years, played extremely well as they dominated inside the paint with baskets and rebounds. Minnesota outrebounded the Sparks 48-28. The Sparks had outrebounded the Lynx in Game 3 and that was a point of emphasis for the team to be more physical inside.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening“To compete with Minnesota, you have to stay in the same game with them in the rebounding,” Sparks coach Brian Agler said. “Obviously, that was a wide margin. They were more aggressive, no question. They doubled our free throw attempts. I’m not saying that to debate the officiating. The point is they were a lot more aggressive and got themselves to the free-throw line. They gave themselves opportunities and second-chance points on the offensive boards. We didn’t play the way we needed to play to have success against them.”Odyssey Sims led the Sparks with 18 points and Nneka Ogwumike added 17. No Sparks player reached double figures in rebounding. Winter storm threatens to scramble Thanksgiving travel planscenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Candace Parker, who finished with 11 points and eight rebounds, and the Sparks are hoping to become the league’s first repeat champion since Los Angeles in 2002.In order to do that, they’ll have to win on Minnesota’s home floor again.Ogwumike doesn’t enjoy that storyline, even though it finished with a storybook ending for the Sparks last season.“No disrespect to that question, but I’m really tired of that question,” Ogwumike said. “This year is this year. No disrespect at all. It’s just like the 100th time I’ve heard it. This year is a different year, and I know it’s the same and I know that’s what everyone here wants to talk about it, but it’s a different year.”Facing an end to their season, the Lynx were aggressive from the start, grabbing a lot of loose balls and dominating the glass. They trailed 10-8 before scoring 11 straight points in the first quarter.ADVERTISEMENT Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim The Lynx made 19 of 30 free throws while the Sparks shot just 16 and made 12.RAINING ON THE 3-POINT PARADEThe Sparks missed 17 of 22 3-point attempts. Four of the five starters missed all of their 3-pointers. Alana Beard, Ogwumike, Parker and Chelsea Gray were a combined 0-for-12.Flying the friendly skies?The Sparks and Lynx are on the same flight from Los Angeles to Minnesota on Monday.TIP-INSActor Anthony Anderson, actress Vivica A. Fox, former WNBA player Tina Thompson and Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti were at the game. … The Sparks went into their locker room during the national anthem in silent protest for the fourth consecutive game. Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Chinese tennis needs to ‘grow up,’ says Li Nalast_img read more

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Chelsea team news: Morata starts

first_imgChelsea v Roma Chelsea team news: Morata starts in return for Champions League showdown with Roma Goal Last updated 2 years ago 01:50 10/19/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Alvaro Morata Chelsea Stoke City Chelsea v Roma UEFA Champions League Roma Chelsea The Spain striker returns from injury to start the Blues’ Group C clash with the Serie A side Alvaro Morata is fit to start for Chelsea as the Blues host Roma in their Champions League Group C clash at Stamford Bridge.The Spain striker sustained a hamstring injury in the club’s 1-0 defeat to Manchester City before the October international break and missed out on Chelsea’s shock loss to Crystal Palace last weekend.Michy Batshuayi, who started the Palace match, drops to the bench to make way for Morata. Willian and Victor Moses also drop to the bench with the latter out for around a month due to a hamstring injury he sustained in the last match.  Article continues below Editors’ Picks Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. Chelsea team: Courtois, Azpilicueta, Christensen, Cahill (c), David Luiz, Zappacosta, Bakayoko, Fabregas, Alonso, Hazard, Morata. #CHEROM pic.twitter.com/QGsER1sKgv— Chelsea FC (@ChelseaFC) October 18, 2017Chelsea are switching formation to a 3-5-2 with David Luiz moving into midfield. N’Golo Kante’s absence through injury was hard felt at Selhurst Park and Antonio Conte will hope that Luiz can provide the midfield with more resiliance. Andreas Christensen returns to the line up for the three man defence.  Chelsea XI: Courtois, Azpilicueta, Christensen, Cahill (c); David Luiz, Zappacosta, Bakayoko, Fabregas, Alonso; Hazard; Morata. GFX Chelsea XI vs Roma 18102017last_img read more

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Worlds 1st Class Approved 3D Printed Ships Propeller

first_imgzoom Dutch Damen Shipyards Group has presented today its 3D printed ship’s propeller, the WAAMpeller, following a rigorous testing process, verified by Bureau Veritas.This project is the result of a close collaboration between RAMLAB, Promarin, Autodesk, Bureau Veritas and Damen launched seven months ago.Promarin provided the design of the triple-blade propeller. The Port of Rotterdam’s RAMLAB (Rotterdam Additive Manufacturing LAB) carried out fabrication using Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) techniques, supported by Autodesk’s expertise in software, robotics and additive manufacturing.Damen provided research and development resources in addition to one of its Stan Tug 1606 vessels for operational testing purposes. Bureau Veritas’ role was to verify the entire development, production and testing process.298 layers of 3D printingThe consortium reached its first milestone in August with the completion of the first WAAMpeller prototype. With valuable experience gained, production of the second version, with the aim of achieving class certification, started immediately, Damen explained.“Production of the second WAAMpeller was greatly improved because we had learned a lot from producing the prototype,” says Vincent Wegener, Managing Director RAMLAB. “This mainly concerned the hardware/software interaction because, when laying down 298 layers of Nickel Aluminium Bronze alloy, it is important to have a tight control on all process parameters.”With the second WAAMpeller complete, the project then progressed to the testing stage, the first phase of which saw the WAAMpeller installed on a Damen Stan Tug 1606. “This particular vessel is of extra interest in that it is equipped with a Tier III compliant engine, making it future proof for the ever stricter environmental rules and regulations in harbours around the world,” comments Martin de Bruijn, Managing Director Workboats at Damen.Damen’s testing engineers performed operational testing of the WAAMpeller on November 20, with representatives from all of the consortium partners present. Furthermore, the day’s procedures were overseen by Bureau Veritas surveyors throughout.According to Martijn Nieuwenhuijs, Chief Executive of Bureau Veritas Marine & Offshore Netherlands, some challenges needed to be tackled along the way, but the final product is technically sound and ready for commercial application.The testing programme included bollard pull and crash stop testing in addition to speed trials.“We are pleased to report that the WAAMpeller displayed the same behaviour as a conventional casted propeller in all of the tests. This includes the same level of performance in the crash stop scenario, which – going from full throttle ahead to full throttle reverse – is the heaviest loading that a propeller can experience.“From day one, this project has been characterized by a good working atmosphere and team dynamics, so there were quite a few high-fives on board when we had successfully completed the tests,” Kees Custers, Damen Project Engineer R&D said.“This project has shown the shipbuilding industry the potential of 3D printing techniques for the production of vessel components. We continue our intensive research into this very exciting area,” Allard Castelein, CEO Port of Rotterdam said talking before the WAAMpeller unveiling.Image & Video Courtesy: Damenlast_img read more

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