Residents gather to show community spirit, strength

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhy these photogenic dumplings are popping up in Los Angeles “We came to show the kids to say ?no’ to drugs,” said Adventure Park Recreation Leader Margie Jimenez. “The kids are getting hoarse, yelling: ?Say no to drugs’ and getting cars to honk.” As they marched, they carried anti-drug posters, and children blew whistles. “We don’t use drugs, and we came because my family is drug free,” said 9-year-old George Acosta. Every year on the first Tuesday in August, residents nationwide are asked to leave their porch lights on and join in block parties, cookouts, parades, police demonstrations, community safety fairs and meetings. “This is about us coming together as a community,” said Whittier police spokesman Jason Zuhlke. “It’s about coming out against drugs and crime.” • Photo Gallery: 08/01: National Night Out Nicole Lund parked her car at the South Whittier Community Resource Center and joined hundreds of others in a two-mile march just before dusk Tuesday. “I have to deal with a lot on my block,” Lund, 36, said. She marched with a 15-year-old neighbor and others for the annual nationwide National Night Out celebration against drug- and gang-related crime. “People sell drugs on my block. Our kids are afraid to play outside,” Lund said. The group marched up Telegraph Avenue to the Sheriff’s Training Academy and Regional Services center, where they gathered to show their support for police and their community. In Pico Rivera, couples danced to a live band at the city’s National Night Out celebration. Two 13-year-old Blair Middle School students milled around with hundreds of other residents who went to see neighbors, eat snacks and visit vendor booths. “It’s a fun fair, and you learn,” said Chad Toney, 13. “I learned how kids will take drugs to school. They take water bottles full of wine.” Whittier Police Department officers gave children ride- alongs in patrol cars at a Michigan Park National Night Out celebration. Officer Dean Montgomery and his canine partner Brik demonstrated what they do, and showed the crowd how Brik barks and bites to apprehend criminal suspects. Harry Jacobs, 64, learned about the Michigan Park event after his home was vandalized earlier this year. “I woke up one morning to go to Coast Guard duty. I went out to get the paper, and someone had broken off the carriage lights in my front yard,” Jacobs said. “It turned out that was the fourth time something like that happened in our intersection in the past few weeks.” In response, Jacobs has helped start a Neighborhood Watch group in his east Whittier neighborhood. Officers said that community involvement in local crime is one goal for National Night Out. “Our goal is to constantly maintain Neighborhood Watch groups all year,” said Whittier Sgt. Aviv Bar. “We rely on citizens to organize other citizens.” Pico Rivera Peace Project Founder Stephen Chavez said he began organizing city National Night Out celebrations after his 14-year-old goddaughter Desiree Macias was accidentally caught in the crossfire of gang violence in 1982. “We had a special need to emphasize gang and youth violence,” Chavez said. “We started it to teach families to talk to their children about violence.” sandy.mazza@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3026160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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State Highlights New Va GovernorElect Pledges To Expand Medicaid

first_imgState Highlights: New Va. Governor-Elect Pledges To Expand Medicaid This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. A selection of health policy stories from Virginia, Wisconsin, Florida, California and Colorado.The Associated Press/Washington Post: McAuliffe Elected Governor, Defeats Cuccinelli After Pledging To Expand State’s Medicaid RollsIn his emotional concession speech, Cuccinelli also noted the lopsided spending and vowed he would not give up on his fight against Democrats’ national health care law. … From the outset, the campaign shaped up as a barometer of voters’ moods and a test of whether a swing-voting state like Virginia would elect a tea party-style governor. Republicans bet a deeply conservative candidate would be their best shot at holding onto the governor’s office, passing over a lieutenant governor for Cuccinelli, a crusader against the federal health care law (11/6).The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Health Plan Cost Increases Below 7% For Large Area EmployersEmployers and employees in the Milwaukee area overall saw larger increases in the cost of health benefits this year than in 2012, with the smallest employers seeing the sharpest increases, according to an annual survey done by HCTrends. The online survey, in which more than 200 employers participated, found that health plan costs increased on average by 8 percent to 10 percent this year compared with an average increases of 5 percent to 7 percent last year (Boulton, 11/5). Miami Herald: Miami-Dade Voters Approve $830 Million For Jackson Health SystemFour months of campaign messages about the long-deferred needs of Jackson Health System and the urgency for the aging public hospital system to more effectively compete against South Florida’s private and not-for-profit hospitals paid off Tuesday (Chang,11/5).The California Health Report: Doctors To Check For Domestic Abuse During Regular ExamsStudies show that the majority of Californians — as many as two-thirds — don’t know where to turn for help if they, or someone they care about, is a victim of domestic violence. Meanwhile, research shows that 44 percent of adult women suffer domestic abuse at some point in their lives, according to figures from Kaiser Permanente. But a new provision of the Affordable Care Act could change those estimates, and soon. As of Jan. 1, health care providers will begin screening all women during regular checkups for signs of domestic abuse (Bookwalter, 11/6).California Healthline: New Map Shows Health Technology ReachCalifornia Health eQuality yesterday released a map of health information organizations across the state. It shows a marked increase from last year’s tally of counties that have some kind of health information exchange network. “It shows progress,” said Rayna Caplan, senior program officer at the UC-Davis Institute for Population and Health Improvement, which oversees the CHeQ program. … The map highlights 35 counties which either have operational or emerging community HIO initiatives. That’s well over half of California’s 58 counties, and it’s a big difference from last year’s progress, Caplan said (Gorn, 11/5).Health Policy Solutions (a Colo. news service): Tepid Recovery Leaves One In Seven UninsuredThe number of uninsured people declined slightly in Colorado over the last two years as the economy began to rebound. But more than 741,000 people — or one in seven Coloradans — has remained uninsured while another 720,000 are underinsured, meaning that their out-of-pocket health costs exceed 10 percent of their income. Nearly half of the uninsured said they’ve gone without health coverage for more than five years and one in 10 have never had it (Kerwin McCrimmon, 11/5).last_img read more

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