Laurie Foster | Much for ISSA to consider

first_img Unfortunate alterations Another Jamaican school-boy football season has come to its end. The person or persons who wrote the script should be on a high, given that so many boxes, which seem to promote progress, have been ticked. It was a season for the palates which delight in history. Cornwall College pouched the 5-year-old Champions Cup trophy for all-island knockout encounters, a historic first for a rural school. Competitions like the Manning Cup, which Kingston College took after 32 years in the wilderness, and the daCosta Cup and Olivier Shield, both going to Clarendon College, have been around for decades. The North Street school, coached by Ludlow Bernard, was wondering if it would ever happen, while the Lenworth Hyde Clarendonians were adamant that their success should be dedicated to the recently departed Jamaican icon, coach Winston Chung-Fah who, with Hyde as the talisman, crowned them the bigwigs in 1977-78. However, regardless of the history, changes are always welcome, provided they redound to a healthier state in the format and its execution. As a look is taken on the stewardship of the governing body for all three early vintage competitions, the Inter-Secondary Schools Sports Association (ISSA), Foster’s Fairplay is attracted to two innovations that, if sustained, will give a new look and feel for what is to come. One of these, which actually came into being for 2018, is the amendment in the regulations under which the Walker and Ben Francis trophies are contested. With so much having already been said, a significant amount in rejection, it is sufficient to refer to this particular alteration as unfortunate. Both conceptualisers of these trophies have passed, but it leaves a question. Could it have been in their thoughts to have teams who fall short of the excellence, which they portrayed in their own careers, vie against one another and at the end of the day be called champions. This is the label now given to Charlemont and Hydel, the rural and urban winners, respectively. Messrs Walker and Francis were both captains of the education industry, and it is difficult to conceive that they would want to recognise and reward teams which fall in the category that the two last-named have. What is further troubling is that teams which advanced to the later stages of the competition end up empty-handed, while the St Catherine duo can look at the trophies, which now adorn their cabinets. They are to be congratulated, as they played the games and triumphed with the format which was open to them. It cannot be their fault why such a lopsided decision was made. Meanwhile, the teams that advanced from the opening round in which the lucky duo was ousted have just got to go back to the training ground and hope that fortune will favour them next time around. In fairness to ISSA, they have voiced an intention to take a second look at the situation, which tends to confirm that the original ruling had some faults. On the plus side from ISSA are the new regulations governing the recruiting of athletes from one school under their canopy to another. To put it in its simplest form, no receiving school will be able to register more than three athletes for competition in 2019 and beyond. Those who qualify through the sixth form route are not affected. Foster’s Fairplay welcomes this amendment. It will compel the schools which are in the business of recruiting to be more selective in their choices as to who to bring in. The bottom line to this activity is clearly to enhance the status of the team and place it in a more advantageous position to challenge for Champs honours. There have been accusations in the past that schools will import athletes who are not needed immediately, as they seek to deny a close rival the chance of signing those athletes. This also denies the athlete the opportunity to make his or her own mark, even if it is inferior to the so-called ‘better recruits.’ There is such a phenomenon as ‘late bloomers.’ ISSA should be lauded for this astute move which should, in addition, lead to a wider spread of talent on show at the high-school level. Is that not what is required? Feedback: e-mail: lauriefoster2012@gmail.comlast_img read more

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FKF slap MoU in bid to promote 6, axe 4

first_imgIn a slap to the face of consensus on a matter that almost paralysed the start of the top flight season, the federation mandarins turned back on the deal they had thrashed out with KPL to restore decisions taken during Special General Meeting that passed the resolution to have 18 teams.“Regarding the composition of the top-tier league for the 2016 season and beyond, the decisions of the Special General Meeting held in Kakamega on January 30th, 2015 and the Third Annual General Meeting held in Nairobi on August 28th, remain in force in the context of determining the number of clubs to be relegated and promoted.“In this regard, four (4) teams will be relegated from the top-tier league and six (6) promoted from the FKF Premier League to make a league of 18 teams,” part of the statement read.However, this is a huge contradiction of the MoU agreed upon between FKF and KPL in October, where it was agreed two teams will be promoted and two to be promoted from the second tier FKF-PL.KPL has maintained they will retain a 16-team format outlining,“The MoU is the latest document and we will stand by it. We just had a governing council meeting today (Tuesday) and re-affirmed our stand with the MOU. I don’t get what FKF is trying to do because we signed the document together and agreed,” KPL boss, Jack Oguda underscored.It paves way for another bruising battle off season with the SPL ending this weekend as the FKF-PL’s conclusion is mired in confusion.Leading a FIFA delegation in March, Ghana Football Association President, Kwesi Nyantakyi ordered FKF and KPL to discuss the  relegation and promotion criteria before signing an MoU before June.The issue of forming an 18-team top tier was the bone of contention between the two at the beginning of the season that gave rise to parallel top flights as the standoff persisted.Should they bulldoze their latest wish, Chemelil Sugar, Nairobi City Stars and KCB risk being drooped as the league concludes this weekend.It is not clear who would be promoted from the second tier after FKF-PL clubs boycotted the league when the federation awarded Kisii based Shabana FC and Kakamega Homeboyz boardroom points accusing West Kenya and St. Anthony of fielding ineligible players.“Clubs participating in the FKF Premier League which recently decided to abscond from honouring their fixtures will lose points for the matches absconded and will face severe disciplinary action as guided by the FKF Constitution, FIFA Statutes and the FIFA Code of Ethics that is binding on them.“Further, in addressing themselves to the Memorandum of Understanding between the Federation and Kenyan Premier League, the clubs were displaying a lack of understanding of the provisions of Article 9 (2) & 9 (3) of the Sporting Integrity provisions of the FIFA Statutes that exclusively vest the authority to determine the criteria for promotion and/or relegation of clubs to the Federation,” the statement from FKF added in trying to defend their latest dictatorial edict.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000FKF President, Sam Nyamweya during the launch of his election manifesto in 2011.NAIROBI, October 27 – Football Kenya Federation has gone against the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) agreed between them and Kenyan Premier League after declaring four teams will be relegated while six will join the top flight next season.The new development was reached upon on Tuesday after the federation’s National Executive Committee met in Nairobi.last_img read more

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Another Tottenham player reveals delight in snubbing Arsenal

first_img1 Despite a lack of silverware, Jan Vertonghen says he made the right decision to join Tottenham instead of Arsenal in 2012.Both teams wanted the defender, who was playing for Ajax at the time, but was convinced to move to White Hart Lane.“It was as close as it can get. My agent went to Arsenal, I wasn’t there myself but it was very respectful and in the end I had to make a choice and I chose Spurs,” he told The Mirror.“I chose Spurs and I think it’s turned out well. I felt I was joining a great team, with great plans and the personal chats I had with people at Spurs were great and I followed my instinct, my gut feeling and that’s it.”In that time Arsenal have won three FA Cups, while Vertonghen has played in one League Cup final, but believes Tottenham are close to winning a first trophy since 2008.They are still in the FA Cup and Champions League where they have beaten Real Madrid and Borussia Dortmund this season.“Sometimes you need that trophy or a big win against at Real Madrid or top six side to realise how good you are. I am convinced that if you win one trophy, then the rest will follow,” he said.“We are going to challenge for both (the FA Cup and Champions League) and then we are trying to finish in the top four, so we have three targets. This is what we are playing for and very confident we can keep it going.”Earlier in the week, Spurs striker Harry Kane revealed that being released by Arsenal when he was a boy was a blessing.“It might sound ridiculous,” he explained. “I was only eight when they let me go, but every time we played them, I thought, ‘Alright, we’ll see who’s right and who’s wrong’.“Looking back on it now, [being released by Arsenal] was probably the best thing that ever happened to me because it gave me a drive that wasn’t there before.” Jan Vertonghen could have joined Arsenal in 2012 last_img read more

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Coyle intentionally hid nose break from Keillor-Dunn

first_imgOwen Coyle said he deliberately hid the news of Davis Keillor-Dunn’s suspected broken nose from the player to help keep him focused.The winger scored one goal and set up another two in Ross County’s 4-1 win over Dundee on Saturday in the Scottish Premiership.It was a vital result for the Staggies as they ended a run of no wins since the beginning of November and closed the gap at the bottom of the table to three points.Alex Schalk was on target twice and Tim Chow added a fourth late on, but it was the performance of Keillor-Dunn that left Coyle tipping him for higher honours. “I was told at half-time that he had a suspected broken nose which I told the physio and doctor not to tell him in case it put him off his game,” the manager said. “He’s a great kid, had been out injured and I think he should be in the next Scotland under-21 squad.”The 20-year-old joined Ross County’s development squad in summer 2016 and played his part in leading them to the league title.He made his first-team debut in August and has gone on to be a regular, scoring three goals in 25 appearances so far.last_img read more

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Harrison County Inmate Roster – 3-1-18

first_imgMarshall, Michael L.Battery on OfficerDisorderly ConductResisting Law EnforcementAlbro, Jason M.Battery resulting in Serious Bodily InjuryBroyles, Michael R.FTA – Poss of MethFTA – Poss of Narcotic DrugFTA – Maintaining a Common NuisanceFTA – Poss of Paraphernalialast_img

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