New Jersey launches partnership to develop EV infrastructure

first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on June 25, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicles Magazine New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy has launched the New Jersey Partnership to Plug-In, which aims to develop EV infrastructure throughout the state and register 330,000 zero-emission vehicles by 2025.The partnership will be led by the state’s Board of Public Utilities, Department of Environmental Protection and Economic Development Authority. Each participating agency will oversee its own set of tasks, including:Mapping existing and planned charging assetsInstalling EV charging infrastructureWorking with lawmakers to create an EV rebate and inventive programCreating an attractive corporate environmentThe Department of Transportation, Motor Vehicle Commission and Department of Community Affairs will also participate by performing tasks such as installing signage and tracking vehicle registrations.The New Jersey Partnership to Plug-In will also dedicate $7 million of the money it received from Volkswagen settlement funds for fast-charging infrastructure technology.Governor Murphy said, “The New Jersey Partnership to Plug-In ensures that we are working collaboratively across state agencies and with our private sector partners, to not only meet, but exceed our goal of registering 330,000 electric vehicles in New Jersey by 2025. This new initiative is part of our broader effort to make renewable energy solutions work for everyone in New Jersey.”Joseph L. Fiordaliso, New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (NJBPU) President, said, “With the transportation sector contributing more than 40 percent of New Jersey’s greenhouse gas emissions, it is critical that we electrify this industry as part of Governor Murphy’s commitment to 100 percent clean energy by 2050. The NJBPU is eager to partner with our sister agencies in supporting the growth of zero-emission vehicles.” Source: State of New Jerseylast_img read more

Read More
New system accelerates discovery of chemical compounds that inhibit enzyme implicated in

first_img Source:http://www.asbmb.org/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 6 2018Researchers at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), part of the National Institutes of Health, have developed a system to accelerate the discovery of chemical compounds that inhibit an enzyme implicated in a number of cancers. The set of tools and methods, which the researchers used to test more than 16,000 compounds, is described in a new paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.The enzyme, NSD2, is overactive in cancers such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia and certain types of multiple myeloma, so inhibiting NSD2 activity seems like a promising strategy for treating those conditions. But, so far, researchers have not been able to find any chemicals that reliably block NSD2 even in a test tube in the laboratory, much less to test as drug candidates in living models.”There’s a total lack of available chemical probes, druglike molecules, to help study (NSD2) function,” said Matthew Hall, the NCATS scientist who oversaw the new work.Part of the reason it’s been difficult to discover chemical inhibitors of NSD2 is that the enzyme is difficult to work with in the laboratory. NSD2 modifies histones, the proteins around which DNA is wound. For technical reasons, scientists ordinarily would study this kind of activity using a fragment of the enzyme and a fragment of histone protein. But NSD2 works on only whole nucleosomes: units of histone protein in combination with DNA.”(NSD2 and similar proteins) are very picky, because they prefer to only act on whole nucleosomes,” Hall said. “They’re snobby when it comes to what they’re willing to interact with.”Related StoriesInhibition of p38 protein boosts formation of blood vessels in colon cancerResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairMother calls for protein shake regulation after daughter diesCollaborating with the biotechnology company Reaction Biology, Hall’s team, including lead author Nathan Coussens, developed laboratory tests involving whole nucleosomes that could be used to see whether NSD2 was able to modify histone proteins in the presence of various compounds. The compounds the team tested came from NCATS’s massive library of bioactive chemicals.But finding a compound that appears to block NSD2 activity is only the beginning. To confirm that the chemicals identified in the initial massive screen were indeed bona fide inhibitors that would reliably and reproducibly perform this function in future researchers’ studies, the NCATS team needed to use multiple types of biochemical methods to confirm the activity of each compound.”We screened 16,000 molecules, and we got 174 hits, but that doesn’t mean they all really work,” Hall said. “When we whittle away through the (additional screening methods), we get down to 44 molecules. You triage candidates out of your screen after you rigorously ask your molecule to prove itself to you.”With several molecules now having proved themselves in this round of screening, Hall’s team hopes to continue the search for reliable NSD2 inhibitors that can be used as research tools and then, further down the road, possibly as medicines.”We are in the process of planning to screen hundreds of thousands of molecules in order to find molecules that can be optimized for inhibition of NSD2 and disseminate these to the research community,” Hall said.last_img read more

Read More