An Invisible Cloak for Magnetism

first_imgThe subject of metamaterials is mad science at its finest – researchers trying to create materials with properties that don’t exist in nature, and that cannot be made with ordinary atoms. Citation: An Invisible Cloak for Magnetism (2008, March 31) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-03-invisible-cloak-magnetism.html Explore further The researchers then applied a magnetic field to the metamaterial, “pushing” the field through the gaps between the lead plates. The metamaterial showed a diamagnetic response – a weak magnetic repulsion. The strength of the repulsion depended on the ratio between the size of the lead plates and the lattice spacing. For the scientists, this connection was significant: it meant that they could tune the metamaterial’s magnetic properties. The researchers explain that the non-resonant metamaterial could have some advantages over those that consist of resonant structures and have a negative refractive index. The negative refractive index is one way to achieve optical invisibility, but it comes at the price of high loss and frequency dispersion. The researchers plan to use non-resonant metamaterials for other purposes. For instance, a design paradigm called transformation optics tells scientists what properties are needed to achieve a certain effect. Because these properties always have non-negative refractive indices, non-resonant metamaterials can provide the required properties. “Transformation optics is a way to design devices,” Wood explained. “It allows us to mimic transforming space for light, and gives us a prescription for the electromagnetic properties we need to achieve a given effect, like cloaking. However, these properties are not usually found in natural materials, and this is where metamaterials can help. They allow us to make the devices that we design using transformation optics.”More information: Magnus, F.; Wood, B.; Moore, J.; Morrison, K.; Perkins, G.; Fyson, J.; Wiltshire, M. C. K.; Caplin, D.; Cohen, L. F.; and Pendry, J. B. “A d.c. magnetic metamaterial.” Nature Materials, Vol. 7, April 2008, pp. 295-297.Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Light may increase magnetic memory speeds 1000 times, decrease electricity consumption Metamaterials possess nano-scale structures and special effects that can only be created in the lab, which can lead to a variety of interesting applications. For example, some metamaterials have a negative refractive index, meaning they refract incoming light waves “through” themselves rather than back to the source of the light, and act as “invisible cloaks.”Now, researchers from Imperial College London are doing something a little different with metamaterials. In a recent study published in Nature Materials, Fridrik Magnus, et al., have fabricated the first non-resonant metamaterial that operates with light waves of zero frequency. This goal is somewhat different than most studies with metamaterials, which focus on higher frequencies like microwaves and visible light. For one thing, the scientists could use the metamaterial as a building block for a magnetic invisibility cloak. Such a cloak could hide magnetism by guiding an applied magnetic field around a cloaked region.“It is already possible to protect a region of space from magnetic fields; simply surrounding it with a strongly magnetic material will do the job,” coauthor Ben Wood of Imperial College London told PhysOrg.com. “However, a magnetic cloak would go further – it would keep magnetic fields out of the inner region without disturbing the fields outside the cloak.”In the zero-frequency regime, the wavelength is very large, and magnetism and electricity become decoupled. This decoupling allows the researchers to concentrate on the magnetic properties without worrying about the electric ones when designing devices like the cloak. “When we say that ours is a zero-frequency metamaterial, we mean that it behaves as intended only at very low or zero frequency,” Wood explained. “It will interact with light at higher frequencies, but not in a useful way.”The new metamaterial consists of layers of stacked lattices, which themselves are composed of 10 x 10 arrays of thin lead plates. One of the defining properties of a metamaterial is that its lattice spacing must be smaller than the wavelength of light it interacts with. For light with zero frequency, the wavelength is large and diverges, so that this constraint is easily met. The individual lead plates in the design are 300 nanometers thick and 167 micrometers across, with the lattices spaced 100 micrometers apart. last_img read more

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Using direct laser writing to create 3D submicron structures

first_img New VECSEL could mean a step forward for spectroscopy More information: M. Thiel, J. Fischer, G. von Freymann, and M. Wegener, “Direct laser writing of three-dimensional submicron structures using a continuous-wave laser at 532 nm,” Applied Physics Letters (2010). Available online: link.aip.org/link/APPLAB/v97/i22/p221102/s1 Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore further Miniaturized replicate of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin (Germany). Structure written by M. Thiel (Nanoscribe). Citation: Using direct laser writing to create 3D submicron structures (2010, December 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-12-laser-3d-submicron.html The technique that Thiel refers to is one that involves using direct laser writing with a continuous-wave laser to create three dimensional submicron structures. This technique has the potential to be useful in a number of fields, and it offers opportunities to enhance lithography. Thiel and his colleagues, Fischer, von Freymann and Wegener, describe the experiments used to test their state-of-the-art technique in Applied Physics Letters: “Direct laser writing of three-dimensional submicron structures using a continuous-wave laser at 532 nm.”“We are already quite used to seeing lithography in two dimensions,” Thiel says. “Our new technique allows patterning in three dimensions. We use a very local writing tip that exposes only one spot, and that allows us to pattern in 3D.”In order to get this very local writing tip, Thiel and his fellow team members concentrated photons from a laser onto a photo-sensitive material. The tips can be directed by a computer, so it is possible to program the pattern on the computer, and then use the laser to create what has been programmed. “You pattern whatever you want,” Thiel says. “There are a number of possibilities.”One of the things that makes the patterning technique developed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology so unique is that a continuous-wave laser is used. When most scientists think of direct laser writing, they think of focused, mode-locked femtosecond laser pulses. “The continuous-wave laser makes it easier to produce for industry,” Thiel explains. “We wanted to show that you could still do direct laser writing with a continuous-wave laser, and we have shown that it is possible to get state-of-the-art results when using our technique to create submicron structures.”A continuous-wave laser is easier to direct, and it is less expensive than the femtosecond lasers used in the past. This, combined with the fact that Thiel and his colleagues were careful to demonstrate their technique using commercially available photoresists, creates a situation in which lithography for a variety of applications becomes possible.“There are several applications for direct laser writing,” Thiel points out. “Some of the customers who have bought our systems from Nanoscribe have used them to produce cloaking devices, and others have created metamaterials. There are applications in photonics, cell biology or microfluidics.”Thiel maintains that the ideal is to continue to improve the system so that the technique can become more widely available. “We are working to get the technique for direct writing of 3D structures up to the industrial standard for lithography,” he says. “Our system should be very easy for the customer to use, and it offers a number of opportunities for future applications.”“This 3D microworld is very fascinating,” Thiel continues. “And it’s no longer just a laboratory curiosity. You can use our technique to make a design file from your computer into a real structure.” (PhysOrg.com) — “Several groups have been using direct laser writing since the end of the 1990s,” Michael Thiel tells PhysOrg.com. Thiel is a scientist has been working at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany. “Direct laser writing has evolved rapidly, and direct laser writing is used in lithography. The group I have been working with has made even more improvements, and the technique we have developed is so successful that we spun off a company, Nanoscribe, which is located in an incubation facility on campus.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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NASA develops Augmented Reality headset for commercial pilots

first_imgImage: NASA Automation in the air dulls pilot skill Augmented reality is where computer generated images are projected onto a piece of glass that the user looks through. In so doing, the user can see both the real world and the images that are displayed, which are tied to real world objects. An AR device for commercial pilots for example could display what looks like the actual runway (and tower, other planes, etc.) as a plane approaches for landing in fog. Once on the ground, it could display the runway centerline, as well as interconnecting runways, and the taxi pathway that is supposed to be followed. Because most commercial plane accidents occur during landing, takeoff or when taxiing, more focus has been aimed at providing tools to pilots to help them better see what is going on.The new AR headset is designed to do just that. It fits over the head, and has one eyepiece that the pilot looks through. It also uses gyroscopes and sensors that read pieces of paper placed on cabin walls to orient itself so that it can correctly interpret which direction the pilot is looking and respond accordingly. It also includes voice recognition software to allow the pilot to communicate with the system orally. Examples of Synthetic Vision System Displays. Image: NASA © 2011 PhysOrg.com Explore furthercenter_img The system is similar in some respects to AR headsets worn by pilots of military jets and helicopters and is an improvement over current headsets used on some commercial flights that overlay information in front of the pilot, but aren’t tied to the real world. None of the technology in the headset is new, and in fact all of the information they provide to a pilot is now currently available. The difference is the headset will allow the pilot to keep his or her eyes focused on where the plane is heading, rather than having to look away to study maps or electronic devices.The AR headset is part of a larger effort by NASA to improve visualization for pilots, called Synthetic Vision. The idea is to eventually move augmented reality imagery to the windshield in a way that is both informative and free of unnecessary clutter that could get in the way of actually flying the plane. Citation: NASA develops Augmented Reality headset for commercial pilots (2012, March 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-03-nasa-ar-headset-commercial.html (PhysOrg.com) — NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia has been hard at work developing an Augmented Reality headset for use by commercial pilots to help reduce airline accidents due to poor weather and overcrowding at airports. The results of that effort have now become known as NASA has recently begun searching for a company to make and market the headset which thus far, doesn’t have an official name. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Intels Haswell to extend battery life set for Taipei launch

first_img(Phys.org) —One key selling point in laptops is battery life and Intel earlier this week had good news on that very front. Its upcoming Haswell processors will give users 50 percent more battery life than Ivy Bridge. © 2013 Phys.org Explore further That is just one part of what Intel thinks is so great about Haswell. Haswell chips were designed (1) to reduce power consumption, (2) have design advantages to accommodate both tablets and laptops, and (3) deliver longer battery life. In idle or standby mode the chips will extend the computer’s battery life by up to 20 times. Voltage regulators were consolidated, to reduce power consumption and that has also translated into smaller motherboards for Haswell chips, in step with smaller devices. The other bit of good news is that there will be no tradeoff in performance, Intel will formally launch the new chips next month at Computex trade in Taipei. Haswell chips are said to achieve low power consumption from a power management unit that provides a view of energy consumption on the chip. It can dynamically adjust consumption in various parts of the chip to reduce the power draw. Faster interconnects on the chip also help reduce power use, according to Intel. Data is transferred more quickly, and so the processor cores spend less time working. Haswell represents Intel’s fourth-generation Core architecture. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img More information: via Computerworld Intel will highlight next-gen Haswell processors at next week’s IDF Citation: Intel’s Haswell to extend battery life, set for Taipei launch (2013, May 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-05-intel-haswell-battery-life-taipei.htmllast_img read more

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Study shows that songbirds recognize sound patterns using the overall spectral shape

first_imgEastern Yellow Robin. Credit: Wikipedia. © 2016 Phys.org Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences More information: Micah R. Bregman et al. Songbirds use spectral shape, not pitch, for sound pattern recognition, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1515380113AbstractHumans easily recognize “transposed” musical melodies shifted up or down in log frequency. Surprisingly, songbirds seem to lack this capacity, although they can learn to recognize human melodies and use complex acoustic sequences for communication. Decades of research have led to the widespread belief that songbirds, unlike humans, are strongly biased to use absolute pitch (AP) in melody recognition. This work relies almost exclusively on acoustically simple stimuli that may belie sensitivities to more complex spectral features. Here, we investigate melody recognition in a species of songbird, the European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), using tone sequences that vary in both pitch and timbre. We find that small manipulations altering either pitch or timbre independently can drive melody recognition to chance, suggesting that both percepts are poor descriptors of the perceptual cues used by birds for this task. Instead we show that melody recognition can generalize even in the absence of pitch, as long as the spectral shapes of the constituent tones are preserved. These results challenge conventional views regarding the use of pitch cues in nonhuman auditory sequence recognition. Finally, the starlings were tested to see if the spectral shape was kept the same but the absolute pitch was changed, whether they would recognize a song sequence. The spectral shape has to do with the overall pattern of sound frequency amplitudes. By using a noise-vocoder, Bregman, et al. were able to maintain the spectral shape (i.e., the spectral envelope) of the song sequences while changing the pitch. They also tested the starlings using a piano-tone version of the training sequences, which preserves pitch, but it changes the absolute spectral envelope. In the first 100 trials, the starlings were able to discern the noise-vocoded ascending and descending sound sequences with greater accuracy than chance (approx. 70%). After additional trials, their accuracy increased. The starlings performed comparatively poorer with the piano-toned versions of the training sequences. Statistical comparisons of these results indicate that starlings recognize ascending and descending tone sequences using the absolute spectral envelope as opposed to pitch.”What our results suggest is that starlings, and probably most songbirds, hear these kinds of sounds in a way that is more similar to how humans hear speech,” says Dr. Tim Gentner, principle investigator in this study. “If pressed, you can hear for the pitch of speech, but it’s not part of your normal mindset when you are listening to someone speak. Interestingly, if you noise-vocode a piece of music it becomes nearly indecipherable, whereas vocoding speech is noticeable but doesn’t destroy comprehension. Like music itself, listening ‘musically’ is probably a really specialized, learned skill.” This work challenges the view that songbirds rely on absolute pitch to recognize song sequence. In prior studies, the songbirds were tested with simple song sequences, but in this study, they were tested with more complex sequences. In these complex sequences, the spectral envelope plays a key, but not solitary, role in song sequence recognition. This study helps researchers understand important differences between how songbirds generalize sound sequences and how humans generalize sound. Explore further Citation: Study shows that songbirds recognize sound patterns using the overall spectral shape (2016, February 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-02-songbirds-patterns-spectral.html Songbirds, like humans, can learn sound sequences. They share many common features with human perception of sound and the ability to learn new sounds. However, songbirds perceive sequences of sounds differently. Humans can recognize a sound sequence even if the pitch or timbre changes. For example, most people can recognize “Happy Birthday” whether it is played on an oboe or a trumpet or sung by an alto or soprano. Birds, on the other hand, would not recognize this sound sequence when variations in pitch or timbre occur.The prevailing thought is that birds recognize song patterns based on the sound sequence’s absolute pitch; however, some studies have indicated that there is more to the way birds perceive a sound sequence than pitch. To understand how birds perceive a sound sequence, Bregman, et al. devised an experiment to see how songbirds perceive tone sequences that systematically vary over time in both pitch and timbre.First, they trained five starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) to accurately discern an ascending and descending sound sequence. The starlings were able to distinguish between the ascending and descending sound sequences with over 91% accuracy.Then, they tested the starlings’ ability to recognize a different song sequence that kept the same pitch and timbral pattern as the training sequences. The starlings only correctly identified ascending and descending sequences about 50% of the time, or the same as chance. They were unable to discern even small shifts in pitch. These results seemed to confirm that starlings indeed rely on absolute pitch to recognize a song sequence pattern.Bregman, et al., then tested the starlings by using a sequence of tones from a novel piano timbre at the same pitch as the two training sequences. If the starlings rely on absolute pitch to identify song sequences, then they should be able to discern the ascending and descending tone sequences that match the training pitch but, in this case, do not match the spectral shape. As it turns out, the starlings did not recognize the song sequences. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—New research on how songbirds recognize a sound sequence calls into question the prevailing view that songbirds tend to rely on absolute pitch to recognize a song pattern as opposed to humans who tend to rely on relative pitch. Micah R. Bregman, Aniruddh D. Patel, and Timothy Q. Gentner from the University of California in San Diego and Tufts University demonstrate through behavioral studies that starlings recognize a song pattern by its absolute spectral shape. Their work appears in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Songbirds have a thing for patternslast_img read more

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A direct current DC remote cloak to hide arbitrary objects

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2019 Science X Network Simulated potential distribution with currents flowing from a point source in three different cases. a) A homogeneous and isotropic background only, b) a circular insulator as a hidden object, and c) a hidden object with a remote cloak. d) The electric potential on the line y = − x − 0.45(m). The purple circles and the orange dashed line represent the cloaking and background cases, respectively, while the red line is for the case of the object only. Credit: Light: Science & Applications, doi: 10.1038/s41377-019-0141-2 Journal information: Light: Science & Applications a) Experiment set-up. b–d) The measured potential distributions in experiments when currents flow from a point source through the remote cloak with three different objects: b circular insulator, c) circular conductor (perfect electrical conductor, PEC), and d) square insulator. e) The measured electric potential on the line y = x(m) compared with a no-object background. The circle, triangle, and square dashed lines are for the three cloaking cases, respectively. Credit: Light: Science & Applications, doi: 10.1038/s41377-019-0141-2. In the experimental setup, Chen et al. compared two kinds of cloaking; including a closed, conventional cloak and remote cloaking at DC frequency. A remote cloak could be constructed with one element or with several elements, and the study used two elements as an example. The scientists first transformed the free space into a square cloak, followed by a second transformation to fold the square cloak to open it. The hidden region in the present work still retained space continuity with the background environment, while completely insulated from outside current fields, enabling any arbitrary static object in the hidden region to freely move inside the region while remaining invisible. The phenomenon reported by Chen et al. differed completely from previous DC cloaks, where the cloak performance depended on the shape and conductivity of the hidden object. To overcome this limitation, scientists previously proposed a multifold transformation optics method to design remote cloaking to hide objects of arbitrary shapes. Yet, such designs required double-negative materials that are very difficult to realize. As a result, remotely hiding arbitrary objects is still at a conceptual stage and remains to be experimentally demonstrated. In the present study, Chen et al. proposed the first experimental realization of a remote cloaking device to hide an arbitrary object with a cloak using direct current frequency. They designed the remote DC cloaking device with multi-folded transformation optics and realized a negative resistor network with active elements to play an important role to implement remote function of the DC cloak. The cloak could remotely generate a hidden region without distorting the current. The scientists showed how different objects in the hidden region were invisible. Left: Schematics of two kinds of DC cloaking. a) Conventional cloaking and b) remote cloaking. Right: The schematic of the transformation applied. (a) Meshes for the virtual space with background media. (b) Meshes for the physical space after defined multi-folded transformation. (c) The schematic of the transformation from the conventional square cloak to the remote cloak. Credit: Light: Science & Applications, doi: 10.1038/s41377-019-0141-2 Simulated equipotential line patterns under different hidden objects or positions. The center object with a square insulator, b circular conductor, and c when the source is placed at a different location. Credit: Light: Science & Applications, doi: 10.1038/s41377-019-0141-2 To demonstrate the omnidirectional effect of the remote cloak, Chen et al simulated the steady current-source in a different position relative to the cloak, and the cloaking device still worked as expected. However, they showed that when the distance between the cloak and the object increased, the cloak involved more negative parameters. Accordingly, the computational complexity and memory consumption also increased in the simulation. In total, the simulations generated in the study provided an example to verify the concept of the remote cloak. To experimentally demonstrate the concept, Chen et al. designed and fabricated the remote cloak sample. The cloak required anisotropic and negative conductivity to realize the complex media. The scientists used “mesh-based” transformation optics to design anisotropic conductivity, while using a negative medium with active elements to design negative conductivity. They observed that the DC negative conductivity material provided potential ‘rise’ when the current traversed the material. At DC frequency, the resistor and source could be combined and simplified to a single source with a power supply. To practically realize such effective negative media, the scientists provided the required electric potential with a voltage follower. To practically implement the experiments, they applied four circuit boards to fulfill the negative resistors. One size cloaks all Citation: A direct current (DC) remote cloak to hide arbitrary objects (2019, March 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-current-dc-remote-cloak-arbitrary.html The scientists performed simulations of the cloak with the finite element method analysis using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The simulated current flowed from the point source through the cloak. Chen et al. used a steady current-source at the top right corner of the simulation and simulated the potential distribution where current flowed from a point source in three different scenarios. To verify the object-independent performance of the cloak, Chen et al. tested two additional hidden objects; a square insulator and a circular conductor. They measured the electric potential compared with the cases of the background and object alone, for excellent agreement between the two; indicating that the cloaking performance was independent of the size and shape of the object. , Physical Review Letters , Science Explore further Left: Schematic of the effective negative media (resistor). a) Ideal negative resistor. b) Equivalent negative resistor by applying the impedance match module. c) Simplified two-source module. Right: The circuit design of negative media at direct current frequency. (a) The schematic of the voltage-follower based bleeder circuit array. (b) The fabricated PCB (printed circuit board) sub circuit with 31 legs of equivalent negative resistors. Credit: Light: Science & Applications, doi: 10.1038/s41377-019-0141-2. The ability to hide an arbitrary object with a cloak at a distance from the object is a unique task in photonics research, although the phenomenon is yet to be realized in practice. In a recent study now published in Light: Science & Applications, Tianhang Chen and co-workers at the Key laboratory of Micro-Nano Electronics and Smart Systems, and the State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation in China proposed the first experimental realization of a remote cloaking device. The device can make any object located at a specific distance invisible using a direct current (DC) frequency. More information: Tianhang Chen et al. Direct current remote cloak for arbitrary objects, Light: Science & Applications (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41377-019-0141-2 J. B. Pendry. Controlling Electromagnetic Fields, Science (2006). DOI: 10.1126/science.1125907 Fan Yang et al. dc Electric Invisibility Cloak, Physical Review Letters (2012). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.053902 They included a negative resistor network with active elements to achieve remote function of the DC cloak. Based on the network, Chen et al. were able to remotely generate a hidden region using the cloak, without distorting currents far from the cloaked region, so that the object could continue to interact with its environment. The work showed that any object in the hidden region was invisible to a DC detector and the cloak did not require prior knowledge of the object allowing it to hide an arbitrary object. The scientists showed the superiority of the remote cloaking device for potential future applications in medical or geologic research. Transformation optics can be used to engineer a cloak that guides electromagnetic waves to bypass the cloaked region without any disturbance. Previous research on cloaks and illusion devices involved enclosing the device, preventing its interaction with the external environment, as well. To solve this problem, scientists proposed a remote cloak that could hide an object from a distance, based on the concept of an ‘anti-object,’ where scattering of the hidden object was cancelled by the ‘anti-object.’ The results were obtained at a distance, while the hidden object kept space continuity with the background environment. However, this ‘anti-object’ cloak was only designed for a hidden object with known dimensions or parameters, therefore, small changes in object size, shape and its position deteriorated the exact restoration of the incident field. The ‘anti-object’ cannot therefore hide arbitrary objects as a conventional cloak can. To verify the device performance, the scientists fabricated the whole circuit board at a size of 60 x 60 cm and achieved the required electric conductivity with surface mounted device (SMD) resistors. They then designed the negative media, cloaked object and boundary matching with independent circuit boards separated from the main board for ease of replacement. The scientists measured the results for three different hidden objects, including a circular conductor and square insulator. In the results, the equipotential lines appeared “round” as if nothing was there, to indicate the experimental design worked appropriately in practice. The outcome was possible since the experimental setup cancelled the distortion caused by the different hidden objects to indicate good cloaking functionality. The outcome was further strengthened when Chen et al. analyzed the electric potential decay from the source for the three experiments, where the results agreed well with the no-object background. The performance of the proposed remote cloak was independent of the object. In this way, Chen et al. experimentally demonstrated a remote cloak that worked for arbitrary objects at a distance using DC frequency for the first time. Since the electronic components they used were DC static elements, the cloak was much more stable than those engineered with high frequencies. Most importantly, the cloak was able to guide electric currents around a hidden object with the help of active elements as the object maintained physical connection to its environment. For instance, such arbitrary objects can be buried underground with a cloaking device deployed on the object at a distance for its invisibility under geologic current sensors for applications in geologic research. In addition, the cloak can have potential applications in medicine to prevent interference to devices implanted in vivo.last_img read more

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Structured glam drama

Gupta’s show was high on drama. Models walked in with sideswept long bangs. Ivories with patches of neon on georgette and cotton formed jumpsuits, mermaid dresses, kaftans, blouses. The one-shouldered dress was spotted quite a few times. There were padded shoulders and halter necks, scooped ruches gathered at the neck, digital prints and more.There was a mix of structure and fluidity with lots of kimono sleeves and even some pre-stitched saris.

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Medical student receives financial support from state

first_imgKolkata: The Mamata Banerjee government has extended all support to a medical student to carry on with his studies.Soujanya Chakraborty on Tuesday went to Nabanna, along with his father Niranjan Chakraborty. They went to the Chief Minister’s Office. Soujanya received a cheque of Rs 50,000 from the state government to carry on with his studies withoutfacing any trouble.He also received assurances of all the support required for continuing his studies. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeIt may be recalled that Chief Minister Mamata banerjee had mentioned about Soujanya while addressing the Martyrs’ Day’s rally.She said that she has come to know about him from an article in a Bengali daily and subsequently had a talk with him over telephone.She assured all help to Soujanya. It may be mentioned that the Mamata Banerjee government has taken several steps in the past seven years to ensure that children in the state can continue with their higher studies.She introduced the project ‘Kanyashree’ to extend support to girl students to continue with their higher studies.last_img read more

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Dalit literature festival to be held in December

first_imgThe first edition of the Dalit Literature Festival will be held from December 6 to 8 on the 62nd death anniversary of B R Ambedkar, the organisers said on Friday.“An annual not-for-profit literary initiative, Dalit Literature Festival is envisioned as a unique festival built to promote Dalit literature,” said a press release issued by Dalit Literature Festival Planning Board.Dalit literature, whether oral or written, has been an integral and vibrant part of Indian literary tradition for centuries, said the release.The festival will also provide a stage for Dalit culture, arts, films, food, it said.“There are several writers, Dalit and non-Dalit, who have enriched Dalit literature and continue to be committed to this art form. Dalit literature is a movement of protest or awakening, considering its subjects are varied and contemporary,” it said.last_img read more

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TMC sweeps up victory in ward 117 as Amit Singh wins by

first_imgKolkata: Trinamool Congress candidate Amit Singh has won the by-election in ward 117, by defeating his BJP rival by over 5,000 votes.Singh got 7,926 votes while Somnath Banerjee of BJP received 2,444 votes, losing by 5,482 votes. Singh is the son of Tarak Singh, who is the Member, Mayor-in-Council (Drainage) of Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC). Amitava Karmakar of CPI(M) got 1,011 votes, while Abhishek Singh of Congress bagged 436 votes only. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe seat fell vacant after Sailen Dasgupta of Trinamool Congress died in 2016. After this, the seat remained vacant for two years. BJP’s share of votes has gone down substantially. In 2015, when the KMC election took place, BJP received 4,026 votes while Dasgupta got 6,002 votes. Left Front has also witnessed a similar decline. In 2015, the Left Front candidate had received 2,600 votes, while Karmakar received 1,011. There are 18,893 voters in ward 117. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedCommenting on Amit’s success, Tarak Singh said people of the area have voted for development. In the past three and a half years, extensive development work has been carried out in the area. The condition of roads has been improved, better street lights have been installed and the parks that are situated in the ward have been upgraded. “People have voted for the extensive development work that has been carried out in the area,” Singh said. There will be another by-election in ward 82, where Mayor Firhad Hakim will be contesting on January 6, 2019. The seat fell vacant after the sitting Trinamool councillor Pranab Biswas resigned recently.last_img read more

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